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8300 Dorchester Rd Ste B, North Charleston, SC 29418
8300 Dorchester Rd Ste B, North Charleston, SC 29418

Sievert Electrical Contractors LLC

Electricians in York, SC

Contact For Services

Some of our most requested residential electrical services include the following.

Electricians York, SC

Electrical Services for Spas and Pools

Looking to add value to your home? Installing a spa or pool is a wonderful idea to add to your list. Plus, your backyard barbecues will be much more fun. The process of installing a pool or spa isn't something you can handle on your own, though. You will need a team of experienced electricians in York, SC to ensure your system is set up correctly. That way, you can enjoy your pool or spa for years to come, and it'll be in great working order when it's time to sell.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for Pool or Spa Installation?

Installing a pool or spa is a very involved job that includes more than digging out space for a pool or spa. These units are very complex and have a whole host of electrical needs, from heating units and filters to color-changing lights that wow your guests. Having a professional install these parts is vital. Otherwise, you'll be swimming in a dirty, near-freezing pool or spa.

Hiring Sievert Electrical Contractors guarantees your pool or spa will be in proper working order for years and years.

EV Charging Station Installation

Finding a reliable EV charging station when you're out and about is still a gamble in this day and age. While EV charger availability is improving, most EV owners prefer to have a charging station installed at home. But doing so is easier said than done and often requires the help of a professional electrician.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for EV Charging Station Installation?

If you're like most homeowners, you don't have the proper permit to install your own EV charging station. For that reason alone, you need to rely on a pro who has the right tools and electrical know-how to handle the job. Plus, EV chargers need much more voltage than standard electrical systems you may find in your home. That makes installing these devices much more dangerous than average appliances. Hiring Sievert Electrical Contractors to install your charging station ensures it's completed quickly, correctly, and safely.

Electricians York, SC
Electricians York, SC

Standby & Portable Generators

South Carolina's hurricane season is nothing to take lightly. Every year, homeowners in the Lowcountry prepare for high winds, heavy storms, and even evacuation. One of the best ways to protect your home and family in the event of a power outage is to purchase a standby or portable generator that can power your home when electricity is out.

At Sievert Electrical, we offer the equipment and electrical services needed to keep your lights on during emergency power outages. As an Authorized Generac dealer in South Carolina, our standby and portable generators can give you the power you need when it matters most. Contact our office today to discuss what type of Generac generator is best for your home or business.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for Generator Installation?

It's always a safe choice to rely on professionals than yourself when electrical matters are involved. That's true for generator installation, too. At Sievert Electrical Contractors, our team uses OSHA and National Electrical Code standards when installing residential and commercial generators. We know how to properly install generators, maintain them, and recommend them depending on your needs.

Because we truly care about your property and your family, we always take great care to operate with safety and efficiency in mind. When we're done, you'll know without a doubt that you made the right choice hiring our electricians in York, SC

Commercial Upfits

Here at Sievert Electrical Contractors, one of our many commercial services involves turning working vehicles into vehicles that work for you. Whether you're an electrician or occupy a different profession, our commercial upfit services will help make your workday easier and more productive, so you can be more profitable.

Our commercial upfits help experts with a wide range of issues, including:

Electricians York, SC

Organization: One of the most common complaints we hear from tradespeople and business owners is that their trucks or vans are an organizational mess. Our upfit services help you get organized, so you're not having to toss important tools into the back of your truck.

Efficiency: With our commercial upfits in place, you won't waste time trying to find all those items you had to toss in the back of your truck. Our upfits let you carry more gear, maximize your space, and ultimately be more productive.

Professionalism: When you travel to a client's home or business, you need to present a proper image of professionalism. You'll give the wrong impression if your work van is messy and disorganized.

Don't see the commercial electric service you need? Chances are we can still help. Give our office a call today and let us know about the challenges you're facing. In the meantime, here are some additional commercial services that we offer:

  • New Business Construction Wiring
  • Commercial Upfits
  • Panel Upgrades
  • Electrical Grounding
  • Circuit Testing
  • Circuit Breaker Replacement
  • Troubleshooting
  • Commercial Lighting Installation
  • Rewiring and Remodels
  • Safety Inspections
Industrial Panel Upgrades and Installations

Industrial Panel Upgrades and Installations


Are you fed up with spending money on new fuses? Do your employees nag you about weird electrical glitches that interrupt their workflow? If so, it's time to call Sievert Electrical. Our team of commercial electricians will diagnose and remediate your electric panel problems quickly and effectively.

Installing or updating the panels in your industrial facility protects you, your co-workers, employees, and your building from electrical fire risks. Electrical panel installation from our electricians in York, SC is important because it protects your other electrical systems, which prolongs the overall lifespan of your system. Safety is always our top priority at Sievert Electrical Contractors, which is why we believe the right way is the only way to install or upgrade your industrial-grade electrical panels.

Our industrial panel services include:

  • Rewiring
  • Updating
  • Replacing
  • Age of System
  • Bringing Systems Up to Code
Industrial Electric Repair

Industrial Electric Repair


When it comes to electrical repair services, serving industrial needs is often more comprehensive and complex than those in the residential space.

Industrial electricians must deal with more complex electrical systems. These advanced systems often need different equipment and tools when repairs to industrial-grade elements are required. Unlike residential repairs, in industrial settings, electrical systems are usually custom-made for the facility and include unique parts with higher voltages than in the typical home. And while no electrical issue is good, industrial failures have massive repercussions that can often shut enterprises down when their temperature control, machinery, and automated PLCs are affected.

For those reasons alone, you need the best electric pros to perform industrial-level electric repairs. Fortunately, Sievert Electrical Contractors is here to help. Our industrial electricians have the experience and expertise to tackle the most complicated industrial electric repairs, whether you own a warehouse, medical center, or another type of industrial facility.

Contact For Services

The Tri-County Area's Most Trusted Electricians in York, SC

Don't leave your home or business in the hands of unqualified handymen or unlicensed contractors. With decades of combined experience, Sievert Electrical Contractors specializes in a wide variety of custom electrical services. We go the extra mile to exceed expectations, because that's how we would want our families treated. Call us today to discover the Sievert Electrical difference.

Electricians York, SC

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phone-number 843-873-6331

Latest News in York, SC

Update: All lanes open on I-77 after morning crash in York County SC backed up traffic

All southbound lanes of Interstate 77 near Exit 82 in York County, South Carolina, re-opened Friday afternoon after a multi-vehicle crash involving a tanker and other vehicles.The four lanes of southbound I-77 close to the Catawba River were operating after 3 p.m. and the site had been cleared, said Chuck Haynes, York County Emergency Management Director.The crash north of Rock Hill city limits blocked part of the highway for h...

All southbound lanes of Interstate 77 near Exit 82 in York County, South Carolina, re-opened Friday afternoon after a multi-vehicle crash involving a tanker and other vehicles.

The four lanes of southbound I-77 close to the Catawba River were operating after 3 p.m. and the site had been cleared, said Chuck Haynes, York County Emergency Management Director.

The crash north of Rock Hill city limits blocked part of the highway for hours from the overnight hours through the morning commute. Then, two lanes re-opened shortly before noon, according to Haynes and the York County Sheriff’s Office.

Traffic had been backed up on I-77 southbound more than six miles to Exit 88, before two southbound lanes re-opened before noon, officials said.

The S.C. Highway Patrol is investigating the crash but has not released details about the collision.

The back up on the northern side of the crash site caused delays for Fort Mill school district transportation, said Joe Burke, spokesman for the school district.

The district sent out an alert to parents that said:

“We are experiencing bus delays with all routes this morning due to the increased traffic caused by the closure of I-77. We are working to get students transported as quickly as possible but there will be delays across the district this morning.”

Effects on Rock Hill school district traffic were limited mainly to staff who might live north of the district and had to deal with traffic getting to campuses, said Lindsay Machak, spokesperson for the Rock Hill school district.

The York County Sheriff’s Office sent out alerts through the morning hours about the crash.

“There are several people with injuries but no deaths at this time.”

Haynes said one of the vehicles involved was a tanker carrying gasoline. No gasoline spilled from the tanker, Haynes said.

There was no fire, Haynes said.

A small amount of diesel fuel from the truck did spill on the road, Haynes said.

The highway patrol, Riverview Fire Department and other emergency responders were on scene.

An alternative route for traffic was U.S. 21. That highway parallels the interstate from Rock Hill to Carowinds Boulevard near the North Carolina state line.

There are only two bridges in that area -- I-77 and U.S. 21 -- where traffic can move across the Catawba River. All traffic had to use the southbound U.S. 21 bridge, Haynes said.

The number of vehicles involved in the crash has not yet been revealed.

Photos shared on social media by the York County Sheriff’s Office show the tanker truck was left upside down near the Cherry Road exit into Rock Hill.

The South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control was notified, officials said.

This story was originally published August 19, 2022 5:31 AM.

York County has a $443 million decision to make. It could bring hundreds of jobs.

York County could approve an agreement tonight that would bring almost a half-billion dollars of investment and more than 400 jobs.The York County Council is scheduled to vote on fee agreement with an unnamed company and property owner. Code-named “Project Tullamore,” the deal would allow for the company to pay a fee rather than taxes for a set period.The county has to approve three readings to finalize the agreement. T...

York County could approve an agreement tonight that would bring almost a half-billion dollars of investment and more than 400 jobs.

The York County Council is scheduled to vote on fee agreement with an unnamed company and property owner. Code-named “Project Tullamore,” the deal would allow for the company to pay a fee rather than taxes for a set period.

The county has to approve three readings to finalize the agreement. The first vote came Jan. 3. It was by title only, meaning details weren’t given at the time. The second vote comes tonight. The council could finalize the deal, barring any special called meetings ahead of time, as soon as Feb. 6.

County documents say the project involves multiple companies set to establish or expand manufacturing in the county. Project companies intend to invest more than $443 million and create 405 new full-time jobs as part of the agreement. The county, in turn, would assess the property at 4% of its total value for 40 years, with a five-year adjustable rate. The investment would come within eight years.

The company also would get credits for 20 years at up to half of the annual amount it would pay from the negotiated fee. The county vote would authorize the county manager, county attorney and county economic development director to negotiate final terms of the deal.

One company in the agreement already owns land for one or more existing buildings in York County. The other company would make an investment and employ workers based on a lease with that current property owner, county documents state.

If the deal happens, it could help York County and the region rebound from a relatively slow year for such projects in 2022.

The I-77 Alliance is a nonprofit economic development group that covers five South Carolina counties — between and including parts of the Charlotte and Columbia markets. Those counties include York, Lancaster and Chester.

The alliance tracks major new job and investment announcements as corporations make them, dating back almost a decade. Data shows the tri-county area had six announcements in 2022, totaling 363 new jobs and $133.2 million.

That job figure is almost 100 fewer than any other year since at least 2014. The annual average is more than 2,500 jobs.

The total investment last year is the lowest recorded in a year by more than $30 million. The average year brings about $441 million, well more than three times last year.

The six announcements in 2022 were tied with 2019 for fewest in that span. The annual average is about 10 announcements.

Growth last year largely came from companies already in the area. Among announced projects, only Element Designs in Fort Mill and Chief Buildings in Lancaster are new additions. They combined for 202 jobs and $27.1 million of investment. The remaining dollars and jobs come from four company expansions at STIWAS US and Samuel Packaging in York County and Nutramax and US Strapping Co. in Lancaster County.

At 405 new jobs, the project would be on par with announcements such as E&J Gallo Winery in Chester County (496 jobs) in 2021, Stanley Black & Decker in York County (500 in 2017) and Diversy in York County (400 in 2017).

At $443 million of investment, the project would join the likes of E&J Gallo ($423 million), Giti Tire in Chester County ($560 million in 2014) and the announced but failed Carolina Panthers headquarters in Rock Hill ($500 million).

The proposed investment level would put the project as the third-highest in York, Lancaster or Chester counties since at least 2014.

This story will be updated.

This story was originally published January 17, 2023 1:36 PM.

Alarmed by A.I. Chatbots, Universities Start Revamping How They Teach

With the rise of the popular new chatbot ChatGPT, colleges are restructuring some courses and taking preventive measures.While grading essays for his world religions course last month, Antony Aumann, a professor of philosophy at Northern Michigan University, read what he said was easily “the best paper in the class.” It explored the morality of burqa bans with clean paragraphs, fitting examples and rigorous arguments.A red flag instantly went up.Mr. Aumann confronted his student over whether he had written th...

With the rise of the popular new chatbot ChatGPT, colleges are restructuring some courses and taking preventive measures.

While grading essays for his world religions course last month, Antony Aumann, a professor of philosophy at Northern Michigan University, read what he said was easily “the best paper in the class.” It explored the morality of burqa bans with clean paragraphs, fitting examples and rigorous arguments.

A red flag instantly went up.

Mr. Aumann confronted his student over whether he had written the essay himself. The student confessed to using ChatGPT, a chatbot that delivers information, explains concepts and generates ideas in simple sentences — and, in this case, had written the paper.

Alarmed by his discovery, Mr. Aumann decided to transform essay writing for his courses this semester. He plans to require students to write first drafts in the classroom, using browsers that monitor and restrict computer activity. In later drafts, students have to explain each revision. Mr. Aumann, who may forgo essays in subsequent semesters, also plans to weave ChatGPT into lessons by asking students to evaluate the chatbot’s responses.

“What’s happening in class is no longer going to be, ‘Here are some questions — let’s talk about it between us human beings,’” he said, but instead “it’s like, ‘What also does this alien robot think?’”

Across the country, university professors like Mr. Aumann, department chairs and administrators are starting to overhaul classrooms in response to ChatGPT, prompting a potentially huge shift in teaching and learning. Some professors are redesigning their courses entirely, making changes that include more oral exams, group work and handwritten assessments in lieu of typed ones.

The moves are part of a real-time grappling with a new technological wave known as generative artificial intelligence. ChatGPT, which was released in November by the artificial intelligence lab OpenAI, is at the forefront of the shift. The chatbot generates eerily articulate and nuanced text in response to short prompts, with people using it to write love letters, poetry, fan fiction — and their schoolwork.

That has upended some middle and high schools, with teachers and administrators trying to discern whether students are using the chatbot to do their schoolwork. Some public school systems, including in New York City and Seattle, have since banned the tool on school Wi-Fi networks and devices to prevent cheating, though students can easily find workarounds to access ChatGPT.

In higher education, colleges and universities have been reluctant to ban the A.I. tool because administrators doubt the move would be effective and they don’t want to infringe on academic freedom. That means the way people teach is changing instead.

“We try to institute general policies that certainly back up the faculty member’s authority to run a class,” instead of targeting specific methods of cheating, said Joe Glover, provost of the University of Florida. “This isn’t going to be the last innovation we have to deal with.”

That’s especially true as generative A.I. is in its early days. OpenAI is expected to soon release another tool, GPT-4, which is better at generating text than previous versions. Google has built LaMDA, a rival chatbot, and Microsoft is discussing a $10 billion investment in OpenAI. Silicon Valley start-ups, including Stability AI and Character.AI, are also working on generative A.I. tools.

An OpenAI spokeswoman said the lab recognized its programs could be used to mislead people and was developing technology to help people identify text generated by ChatGPT.

At many universities, ChatGPT has now vaulted to the top of the agenda. Administrators are establishing task forces and hosting universitywide discussions to respond to the tool, with much of the guidance being to adapt to the technology.

At schools including George Washington University in Washington, D.C., Rutgers University in New Brunswick, N.J., and Appalachian State University in Boone, N.C., professors are phasing out take-home, open-book assignments — which became a dominant method of assessment in the pandemic but now seem vulnerable to chatbots. They are instead opting for in-class assignments, handwritten papers, group work and oral exams.

Gone are prompts like “write five pages about this or that.” Some professors are instead crafting questions that they hope will be too clever for chatbots and asking students to write about their own lives and current events.

Students are “plagiarizing this because the assignments can be plagiarized,” said Sid Dobrin, chair of the English department at the University of Florida.

Frederick Luis Aldama, the humanities chair at the University of Texas at Austin, said he planned to teach newer or more niche texts that ChatGPT might have less information about, such as William Shakespeare’s early sonnets instead of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

The chatbot may motivate “people who lean into canonical, primary texts to actually reach beyond their comfort zones for things that are not online,” he said.

In case the changes fall short of preventing plagiarism, Mr. Aldama and other professors said they planned to institute stricter standards for what they expect from students and how they grade. It is now not enough for an essay to have just a thesis, introduction, supporting paragraphs and a conclusion.

“We need to up our game,” Mr. Aldama said. “The imagination, creativity and innovation of analysis that we usually deem an A paper needs to be trickling down into the B-range papers.”

Universities are also aiming to educate students about the new A.I. tools. The University at Buffalo in New York and Furman University in Greenville, S.C., said they planned to embed a discussion of A.I. tools into required courses that teach entering or freshman students about concepts such as academic integrity.

“We have to add a scenario about this, so students can see a concrete example,” said Kelly Ahuna, who directs the academic integrity office at the University at Buffalo. “We want to prevent things from happening instead of catch them when they happen.”

Other universities are trying to draw boundaries for A.I. Washington University in St. Louis and the University of Vermont in Burlington are drafting revisions to their academic integrity policies so their plagiarism definitions include generative A.I.

John Dyer, vice president for enrollment services and educational technologies at Dallas Theological Seminary, said the language in his seminary’s honor code felt “a little archaic anyway.” He plans to update its plagiarism definition to include: “using text written by a generation system as one’s own (e.g., entering a prompt into an artificial intelligence tool and using the output in a paper).”

The misuse of A.I. tools will most likely not end, so some professors and universities said they planned to use detectors to root out that activity. The plagiarism detection service Turnitin said it would incorporate more features for identifying A.I., including ChatGPT, this year.

More than 6,000 teachers from Harvard University, Yale University, the University of Rhode Island and others have also signed up to use GPTZero, a program that promises to quickly detect A.I.-generated text, said Edward Tian, its creator and a senior at Princeton University.

Some students see value in embracing A.I. tools to learn. Lizzie Shackney, 27, a student at the University of Pennsylvania’s law school and design school, has started using ChatGPT to brainstorm for papers and debug coding problem sets.

“There are disciplines that want you to share and don’t want you to spin your wheels,” she said, describing her computer science and statistics classes. “The place where my brain is useful is understanding what the code means.”

But she has qualms. ChatGPT, Ms. Shackney said, sometimes incorrectly explains ideas and misquotes sources. The University of Pennsylvania also hasn’t instituted any regulations about the tool, so she doesn’t want to rely on it in case the school bans it or considers it to be cheating, she said.

Other students have no such scruples, sharing on forums like Reddit that they have submitted assignments written and solved by ChatGPT — and sometimes done so for fellow students too. On TikTok, the hashtag #chatgpt has more than 578 million views, with people sharing videos of the tool writing papers and solving coding problems.

One video shows a student copying a multiple choice exam and pasting it into the tool with the caption saying: “I don’t know about y’all but ima just have Chat GPT take my finals. Have fun studying.”

SC Law Enforcement investigating York County’s money transfer to Tepper companies

The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division is investigating the transfer of money from York County to companies owned by Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper, according to a statement from SLED officials.The investigation was opened in November after a request by the S.C. Attorney Gene...

The South Carolina Law Enforcement Division is investigating the transfer of money from York County to companies owned by Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper, according to a statement from SLED officials.

The investigation was opened in November after a request by the S.C. Attorney General, York County sheriff, and York County’s top prosecutor, officials said.

Late Thursday, SLED sent an emailed statement to The Herald confirming the investigation.

That statement says:

“SLED opened an investigation on November 7, 2022 into the transfer of public funds from York County to GTRE and/or it’s affiliates to include David Tepper, Appaloosa Management, Tepper Sports Holding and DT Sports Holding.

SLED was requested to investigate by York County Sheriff Kevin Tolson, York County Solicitor Kevin Brackett and Attorney General Alan Wilson.

This joint investigation with the York County Sheriff’s Office is ongoing, as such, no additional information is available at this time.”

The SLED statement comes a day after lawyers for Tepper companies and York County stated in court documents that the two sides had reached a settlement in the bankruptcy and related lawsuits.

GTRE, or GT Real Estate, is the company created by Tepper to oversee what would have been the NFL team’s headquarters and practice facility in Rock Hill, S.C. The project failed and resulted in GT Real Estate filing for bankruptcy. There also have been other related lawsuits.

In civil court documents from the GT Real Estate bankruptcy and lawsuits filed by York County, Tepper company lawyers have denied any wrongdoing.

Late Thursday, GT Real Estate issued a written statement to The Herald about the investigation.

The statement raised questions about the timing of the investigation announcement, a day after the settlement was confirmed that would, if approved, end the dispute between GTRE and York County.

GT said in the statement that the proposed settlement would pay York County the $21 million it originally asked for in the bankruptcy, plus interest.

The full GT Real Estate statement says:

It would be unfortunate if the recently announced settlement between GTRE and York County were somehow undermined by politically motivated leaks. The timing of these leaks is all the more curious in light of this settlement.

This is a straightforward commercial matter that is being fully resolved. The underlying disputes arise under contracts that were jointly negotiated by the parties and are publicly available. The funds paid by the County were handled consistent with the terms of those contracts.

The settlement fully compensates York County and settles all its claims related to GTRE’s bankruptcy case. To this end, $21.165 million has been escrowed for months to reimburse the County with interest.

No charges have been filed against anyone or any group and there has been no allegation of wrongdoing, sheriff and solicitor’s office officials said.

While there have been pending civil lawsuits for months during the bankruptcy of GT Real Estate, the SLED statement points to the first law enforcement inquiry associated with the project.

In a joint statement released Thursday night by York County Sheriff Kevin Tolson and 16th Circuit Solicitor Kevin Brackett, both said there should be no inference of any wrongdoing.

Here is the entire statement from Tolson and Brackett:

“An investigation into the circumstances surrounding the transfer to, and subsequent use of public money by the Carolina Panthers owner David Tepper and GTRE, the company created to oversee the construction of the Panthers training facility, was initiated by the York County Sheriff to determine whether any laws were violated during that process. The Attorney General, Solicitor Kevin Brackett’s Office and the State Law Enforcement Division have partnered with us to provide additional resources and assistance and we will work together to ensure that all relevant information is gathered so that a fair and just outcome can be reached.

An investigation is simply an inquiry and should not create any inference that wrongdoing has been committed by any party.

This office will have no further comment on the matter at this time.”

A deal had been struck with South Carolina, York County, and Rock Hill officials to move the team’s headquarters and practice fields to South Carolina.

Construction started on the site but GT halted construction in March. GT declared bankruptcy in June.

Appaloosa Management, Tepper Sports Holding and DT Sports Holding are all Tepper companies, according to Tepper company documents in the ongoing bankruptcy case and ongoing lawsuits related to the bankruptcy case.

In the bankruptcy case and related civil lawsuits, York County alleged it gave GT Real Estate more than $21 million in Pennies for Progress road tax money for the project. The county claimed the money could only be used for road improvements.

York County filed suit demanding the $21 million back, plus interest and money for projected tax revenues that were lost when the project collapsed.

This week, lawyers for York County and lawyers GT Real Estate announced in statements and court documents that a proposed settlement had been reached that would end all civil lawsuits between York County and the Tepper companies. That settlement has not yet been filed in court, nor has it been approved by a judge.

York County had previously filed two civil lawsuits against Tepper companies.

In the first lawsuit filed in June in South Carolina federal court, York County alleged DT Sports Holding, Tepper Sports Holding and Appaloosa Management were engaged in a conspiracy to misappropriate the $21 million. That suit, which called the failed practice site a “vanity project,” named Appaloosa Management LP, DT Sports Holding, Tepper Sports Holding Inc, and the City of Rock Hill as defendants. Tepper is one of the founders of Appaloosa Management.

In that civil lawsuit, York County alleged Tepper’s companies directed misappropriation of $21 million.

Then in September, York County filed a suit against GT Real Estate. In that lawsuit, York County claimed GT “squandered” the $21 million and converted it for “others’ improper use and unjust enrichment.”

Tepper company lawyers filed countersuits against York County in those civil cases and denied York County’s allegations of unjust enrichment and misuse of money.

This story was originally published December 1, 2022 7:55 PM.

Element Designs relocating headquarters and manufacturing operations to York County

$5 million investment will bring approximately 100 new jobs to Fort Mill COLUMBIA, S.C. – Element Designs, one of the leading North American manufacturers of custom aluminum frame glass cabinet doors, today announced plans to relocate its headquarters and manufacturing operations to York County. The company’s $5 million investment will bring approximately 100 new jobs to Fort Mill over the next five years...

COLUMBIA, S.C. – Element Designs, one of the leading North American manufacturers of custom aluminum frame glass cabinet doors, today announced plans to relocate its headquarters and manufacturing operations to York County. The company’s $5 million investment will bring approximately 100 new jobs to Fort Mill over the next five years.

Founded in 2003 and currently headquartered in Charlotte, Element Designs’ product offerings have expanded to include custom glass and acrylic surfacing solutions and components. All products are made and fabricated in the United States, with manufacturing processes that use water-based coatings and recycled materials to create products for customers across North America.

Located at 7107 Logistics Lane, Suite 101 in Fort Mill, Element Designs’ new 112,840-square-foot facility will serve as the company’s joint headquarters and manufacturing operations, allowing the company to efficiently serve its international customers, including many well-known manufacturers in the kitchen, bath and office furniture industries.

Operations are expected to be online in the second quarter of 2023. Individuals interested in joining the Element Designs team can submit resumes to the company.

The Coordinating Council for Economic Development approved job development credits related to this project.

QUOTES

“We are very excited to move our headquarters to Fort Mill, S.C. We already feel very welcomed and can’t wait to call it our new home. It will be a transformational move for our company. This new location and state of the art facility will not only provide us with the necessary room to grow, but it will also be a testament to what we as a company want to be recognized for: an innovative industry leader that produces beautiful products in a sustainable way. Its proximity to our current location was also very important as we want our incredible team to move with us and enjoy the benefits of this new space to call home. -Element Designs President and Chief Executive Officer Mike Uebersax

“We eagerly welcome Element Designs to South Carolina. Our state is proud to be home to companies producing some of the most unique, high-quality goods in the world, and we’re proud to add Element Designs to that roster. We’re grateful for the skilled jobs this company will bring to our state and the Fort Mill community.” -Gov. Henry McMaster

“On behalf of the South Carolina business community, we congratulate and welcome the entire Element Designs team to York County. Manufacturers of all sizes and industries have found long-term success in communities throughout South Carolina, and we’re eager to support Element Designs to continue that commitment.”-Secretary of Commerce Harry M. Lightsey III

"We celebrate today's announcement by Element Designs. We are pleased to see that they have found an ideal location in York County to continue to grow their manufacturing operations as well as establish their headquarters. Congratulations to this industry leader. We welcome your growing team to our community."-York County Council Chairwoman Christi Cox

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