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8300 Dorchester Rd Ste B, North Charleston, SC 29418
8300 Dorchester Rd Ste B, North Charleston, SC 29418

Sievert Electrical Contractors LLC

Electricians in Tega Cay, SC

Contact For Services

Some of our most requested residential electrical services include the following.

Electricians Tega Cay, SC

Electrical Services for Spas and Pools

Looking to add value to your home? Installing a spa or pool is a wonderful idea to add to your list. Plus, your backyard barbecues will be much more fun. The process of installing a pool or spa isn't something you can handle on your own, though. You will need a team of experienced electricians in Tega Cay, SC to ensure your system is set up correctly. That way, you can enjoy your pool or spa for years to come, and it'll be in great working order when it's time to sell.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for Pool or Spa Installation?

Installing a pool or spa is a very involved job that includes more than digging out space for a pool or spa. These units are very complex and have a whole host of electrical needs, from heating units and filters to color-changing lights that wow your guests. Having a professional install these parts is vital. Otherwise, you'll be swimming in a dirty, near-freezing pool or spa.

Hiring Sievert Electrical Contractors guarantees your pool or spa will be in proper working order for years and years.

EV Charging Station Installation

Finding a reliable EV charging station when you're out and about is still a gamble in this day and age. While EV charger availability is improving, most EV owners prefer to have a charging station installed at home. But doing so is easier said than done and often requires the help of a professional electrician.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for EV Charging Station Installation?

If you're like most homeowners, you don't have the proper permit to install your own EV charging station. For that reason alone, you need to rely on a pro who has the right tools and electrical know-how to handle the job. Plus, EV chargers need much more voltage than standard electrical systems you may find in your home. That makes installing these devices much more dangerous than average appliances. Hiring Sievert Electrical Contractors to install your charging station ensures it's completed quickly, correctly, and safely.

Electricians Tega Cay, SC
Electricians Tega Cay, SC

Standby & Portable Generators

South Carolina's hurricane season is nothing to take lightly. Every year, homeowners in the Lowcountry prepare for high winds, heavy storms, and even evacuation. One of the best ways to protect your home and family in the event of a power outage is to purchase a standby or portable generator that can power your home when electricity is out.

At Sievert Electrical, we offer the equipment and electrical services needed to keep your lights on during emergency power outages. As an Authorized Generac dealer in South Carolina, our standby and portable generators can give you the power you need when it matters most. Contact our office today to discuss what type of Generac generator is best for your home or business.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for Generator Installation?

It's always a safe choice to rely on professionals than yourself when electrical matters are involved. That's true for generator installation, too. At Sievert Electrical Contractors, our team uses OSHA and National Electrical Code standards when installing residential and commercial generators. We know how to properly install generators, maintain them, and recommend them depending on your needs.

Because we truly care about your property and your family, we always take great care to operate with safety and efficiency in mind. When we're done, you'll know without a doubt that you made the right choice hiring our electricians in Tega Cay, SC

Commercial Upfits

Here at Sievert Electrical Contractors, one of our many commercial services involves turning working vehicles into vehicles that work for you. Whether you're an electrician or occupy a different profession, our commercial upfit services will help make your workday easier and more productive, so you can be more profitable.

Our commercial upfits help experts with a wide range of issues, including:

Electricians Tega Cay, SC

Organization: One of the most common complaints we hear from tradespeople and business owners is that their trucks or vans are an organizational mess. Our upfit services help you get organized, so you're not having to toss important tools into the back of your truck.

Efficiency: With our commercial upfits in place, you won't waste time trying to find all those items you had to toss in the back of your truck. Our upfits let you carry more gear, maximize your space, and ultimately be more productive.

Professionalism: When you travel to a client's home or business, you need to present a proper image of professionalism. You'll give the wrong impression if your work van is messy and disorganized.

Don't see the commercial electric service you need? Chances are we can still help. Give our office a call today and let us know about the challenges you're facing. In the meantime, here are some additional commercial services that we offer:

  • New Business Construction Wiring
  • Commercial Upfits
  • Panel Upgrades
  • Electrical Grounding
  • Circuit Testing
  • Circuit Breaker Replacement
  • Troubleshooting
  • Commercial Lighting Installation
  • Rewiring and Remodels
  • Safety Inspections
Industrial Panel Upgrades and Installations

Industrial Panel Upgrades and Installations


Are you fed up with spending money on new fuses? Do your employees nag you about weird electrical glitches that interrupt their workflow? If so, it's time to call Sievert Electrical. Our team of commercial electricians will diagnose and remediate your electric panel problems quickly and effectively.

Installing or updating the panels in your industrial facility protects you, your co-workers, employees, and your building from electrical fire risks. Electrical panel installation from our electricians in Tega Cay, SC is important because it protects your other electrical systems, which prolongs the overall lifespan of your system. Safety is always our top priority at Sievert Electrical Contractors, which is why we believe the right way is the only way to install or upgrade your industrial-grade electrical panels.

Our industrial panel services include:

  • Rewiring
  • Updating
  • Replacing
  • Age of System
  • Bringing Systems Up to Code
Industrial Electric Repair

Industrial Electric Repair


When it comes to electrical repair services, serving industrial needs is often more comprehensive and complex than those in the residential space.

Industrial electricians must deal with more complex electrical systems. These advanced systems often need different equipment and tools when repairs to industrial-grade elements are required. Unlike residential repairs, in industrial settings, electrical systems are usually custom-made for the facility and include unique parts with higher voltages than in the typical home. And while no electrical issue is good, industrial failures have massive repercussions that can often shut enterprises down when their temperature control, machinery, and automated PLCs are affected.

For those reasons alone, you need the best electric pros to perform industrial-level electric repairs. Fortunately, Sievert Electrical Contractors is here to help. Our industrial electricians have the experience and expertise to tackle the most complicated industrial electric repairs, whether you own a warehouse, medical center, or another type of industrial facility.

Contact For Services

The Tri-County Area's Most Trusted Electricians in Tega Cay, SC

Don't leave your home or business in the hands of unqualified handymen or unlicensed contractors. With decades of combined experience, Sievert Electrical Contractors specializes in a wide variety of custom electrical services. We go the extra mile to exceed expectations, because that's how we would want our families treated. Call us today to discover the Sievert Electrical difference.

Electricians Tega Cay, SC

Contact For Service

phone-number 843-873-6331

Latest News in Tega Cay, SC

York County sues Rock Hill, Tega Cay over money for housing jailed inmates

York County and its sheriff have filed a lawsuit against the cities of Rock Hill and Tega Cay over payment for housing inmates at the county jail.The lawsuit, filed around 5 p.m. Wednesday, is the latest public dispute concerning money -- the Carolina Panthers practice facility apparently has ended because of a dispute over money -- involving York County and Rock Hill.In the lawsuit, York County says the...

York County and its sheriff have filed a lawsuit against the cities of Rock Hill and Tega Cay over payment for housing inmates at the county jail.

The lawsuit, filed around 5 p.m. Wednesday, is the latest public dispute concerning money -- the Carolina Panthers practice facility apparently has ended because of a dispute over money -- involving York County and Rock Hill.

In the lawsuit, York County says the municipalities of York, Fort Mill and Clover have agreed to pay the county $73 per day to house inmates, but Rock Hill and Tega Cay have refused.

Rock Hill leaders acknowledged the lawsuit was filed, but claim the county has not said how it came up with the $73 per prisoner daily fee, a city written statement to The Herald said. Rock Hill residents already pay almost $8 million annually in taxes to support the sheriff’s office, the city statement said.

York County and the York County Sheriff Kevin Tolson are both plaintiffs in the lawsuit. The cities of Rock Hill and Tega Cay are both named as defendants.

The lawsuit states the sheriff’s office has a legal responsibility under South Carolina law to house inmates and operate a county jail. Countywide taxes are collected for this purpose, the lawsuit states.

The issue of conflict is whether the municipalities have to reimburse the county, and how much the municipalities should pay.

The sheriff’s office will continue to accept inmates from Rock Hill and Tega Cay until the issue is resolved by the court, according to the lawsuit. It remains unclear when a judge will order a hearing on the issue.

The full statement from York County reads;

“On Wednesday, due to actions by the Cities of Rock Hill and Tega Cay, York County and Sheriff Kevin Tolson took steps to protect their interests, and the interests of the taxpayers, through legal proceedings. The Cities inside York County have an obligation under the law to provide jail detention services for individuals that they detain. For many years those detention services have been provided by agreement with the County and Sheriff Tolson at the York County Detention Center. Under that agreement the Cities reimburse the County and Sheriff Tolson for the cost of detaining their municipal inmates. This arrangement results in reduction of overall cost for most municipalities when compared to the cost of constructing and operating detention facilities themselves.

“Last year, the Cities declined to pay the County and the Sheriff for these detention services and expected to continue to send their detainees without payment. More recently, the Cities have refused to enter into written agreements with the County and Sheriff Tolson, as required by law, that would govern this joint provision of services. The County and Sheriff Tolson have worked for more than six months to negotiate and obtain the required signatures from each of the County’s municipalities for such a written agreement. Clover, Fort Mill, and York all have signed such agreements; Rock Hill and Tega Cay refuse. This lawsuit seeks a court’s determination that, if Rock Hill and Tega Cay desire to have the County and Sheriff Tolson provide these detention services on their behalf, then they are required to enter written agreements governing the arrangement.”

York County Sheriff Kevin Tolson declined comment.

In a statement to The Herald, the city of Rock Hill said county leaders first tried to make the per day payment almost $100 per day before the amount was cut to $73. But the county still won’t say where the $73 per day cost comes from, and refuses to negotiate, the statement said.

Records obtained by the Herald show the previous amount for was around $43-$42.88 per day per inmate.

The city states that any payments are voluntary and not required under South Carolina law.

The city statement says:

“Today, York County took the unfortunate step of filing a lawsuit against municipalities in York County. The County is completely aware of the City of Rock Hill position that these fees have historically been paid voluntarily as they are not required under state law.

The City does not entirely object to voluntarily paying a fee; however, the City only plans to do so under a fairly negotiated agreement. Just over one year ago, York County unilaterally and arbitrarily announced it was raising the daily fees for boarding prisoners to almost $100 per prisoner per day, essentially doubling the fee. This was done with no provision of information or background on how the fee was calculated.

Many of the municipalities in York County announced they would not pay these fees. Several months later the County provided new information to the municipalities that reduced these arbitrary fees by approximately 20%. However, again no adequate justification was provided for how the fee was calculated.

In the spirit of cooperation and good faith, the City has paid all fees associated with the dispute. The fee has been voluntarily paid, even though there is no law requiring the City to do so. In fact, the state statute requires the County to board all municipal prisoners with no provision for fees....

Beyond paying these fees, City of Rock Hill taxpayers already fund operations related to the Sheriff’s Office through County property taxes paid to the tune of approximately $7.9 million a year. Surely, Rock Hill residents have paid their fair share to York County for these services.

The City has made several offers on how we would be comfortable moving forward under a fairly negotiated agreement; however, York County has refused to negotiate. We look forward to providing additional information before the court and vigorously defending the residents of Rock Hill all of whom are also residents of York County.”

Efforts to reach the city manager of Tega Cay by email were unsuccessful.

The lawsuit is a public record and can be viewed by the public here at sccourts.org.

This story was originally published April 22, 2022 10:43 AM.

Fort Mill road project found unmarked graves near I-77. What’s next for construction?

One of the most anticipated road construction projects in York County will need slight changes after the discovery of graves.Berry Mattox with the South Carolina Department of Transportation updated the Rock Hill-Fort Mill Area Transportation Study policy committee at its Nov. 18 meeting on area projects either in planning or construction phases. That included the interchange upgrade at Interstate 77 and S.C. 160 in Fort Mill.“We discovered eight unmarke...

One of the most anticipated road construction projects in York County will need slight changes after the discovery of graves.

Berry Mattox with the South Carolina Department of Transportation updated the Rock Hill-Fort Mill Area Transportation Study policy committee at its Nov. 18 meeting on area projects either in planning or construction phases. That included the interchange upgrade at Interstate 77 and S.C. 160 in Fort Mill.

“We discovered eight unmarked graves right along the side of the road that were underneath where the road, where we planned on putting drainage,” Mattox said.

A consultant is working through design changes to avoid the area where graves were found. The larger interchange work includes widening S.C. 160 heading toward the interstate and flyover lanes — to avoid left turns — atop it.

“It’s not unusual to encounter a grave,” Mattox said. “But we encountered eight of them. We felt the most prudent thing to do was do what we could to avoid. That’s the first thing, avoid, and then mitigate and avoid.”

Mattox didn’t provide information on what type of graves were found or any efforts to identify them. SCDOT won’t look to acquire the portion of property where the graves are, or disturb them.

SCDOT planned to ask for construction bids early next year. Now, it likely will be early summer, Mattox said. One of the flyover bridges will narrow about 12 feet, which could save about $1 million. The state will acquire less right-of-way to avoid the graves on what in total should be a $92 million interchange project.

“We’re now constricting our design a little bit,” Mattox said. “No operational impact to the project. We had a wide median that we’re necking down. The bridge is actually getting more narrow, so there’s actually some cost savings there. We’re building a less substantial structure over 77.”

The size of the project allows the bridge to narrow in a way that won’t impact traffic.

“There will be no impact to the public,” Mattox said. “It’s a little bit of a kink, but you won’t be able to tell if you’re driving. We’re stretching it out over several thousand feet.”

The Fort Mill interchange is directly between two of the busier areas in York County, Baxter and Kingsley. It’s also a connection point for areas of Fort Mill and Tega Cay to access Charlotte or Rock Hill via the interstate. The interchange is close, and the nearest connection, to the new Piedmont Medical Center Fort Mill hospital.

Another large project in Indian Land remains on hold due to a legal issue. SCDOT plans intersection upgrades at U.S. 521, or Charlotte Highway, and Marvin Road.

“The gas station on the corner, we are having issues acquiring that right-of-way,” Mattox said. “The purpose and need of the project have been challenged, essentially.”

Mattox said attorneys update him monthly, but SCDOT is waiting on a court date. The agency previously argued a legal case by the property owner at the intersection should be dismissed, but it wasn’t. Now the sides will have to make their cases.

“Getting it before a judge has been more difficult than we thought,” Mattox said.

Several other large projects are progressing. The Interstate 77 interchange at Celanese and Cherry roads in Rock Hill should come back for a public meeting to weigh alternatives and cost estimates in early February. At least two, possibly three, options will be presented, Mattox said.

One in consideration now involved a diverging diamond where the interstate meets Cherry Road and dual left turns where it crosses Celanese. The diverging diamond is the setup that opened at Gold Hill Road where it runs over the interstate near Fort Mill and Tega Cay. Another option for the Rock Hill intersection would limit and reconfigure left turns, a key piece of proposed improvements at several interchanges since left turns take longer and back up traffic compared to straight or right turn movements.

“We have a couple of alternatives we feel good about,” Mattox said.

Improvements at Carowinds Boulevard and Pleasant Road in Fort Mill are ongoing. Bids came in early October for India Hook and Celanese improvements in Rock Hill, and that project is in the pre-construction phase.

“I would imagine early next year, probably late January, we’ll start seeing some cones out there,” Mattox said.

The state department also has bicycle or pedestrian lane improvements at various planning or construction phases at Whites Road and Spratt Street in Fort Mill, New Gray Rock Road near Tega Cay and Dave Lyle Boulevard in Rock Hill.

This story was originally published December 2, 2022 12:47 PM.

Should $10 million in public money pay for roads the Panthers were supposed to pave?

Elected officials voted Friday to use $10 million in public money to pave roads near the failed Carolina Panthers headquarters site in Rock Hill. The roads initially were to be funded by the team.Friday’s vote came amid statements of frustration and resignation about the failed Panthers project. Rock Hill, York County and the NFL team are now entangled in bankruptcy court battling over how much money will be paid back — and to whom.The road decision still requires final approval after a 30-day public comment period....

Elected officials voted Friday to use $10 million in public money to pave roads near the failed Carolina Panthers headquarters site in Rock Hill. The roads initially were to be funded by the team.

Friday’s vote came amid statements of frustration and resignation about the failed Panthers project. Rock Hill, York County and the NFL team are now entangled in bankruptcy court battling over how much money will be paid back — and to whom.

The road decision still requires final approval after a 30-day public comment period. And the approved funds are contingent on Rock Hill or York County taking legal title to the property where the roads are.

The Rock Hill-Fort Mill Area Transportation Study will accept online public comments at rfats.org. RFATS allocates federal and state funding throughout urbanized areas of Rock Hill, Fort Mill, York County, Tega Cay, Lake Wylie and Indian Land (in Lancaster County).

York County Councilman Tom Audette sits on the RFATS policy committee that voted Friday. He joined Tega Cay Mayor Chris Gray and Lancaster County Councilman Brian Carnes in voting against the allocation.

“I’m stunned, I guess, that this is coming in front of us,” Audette said. “This money is going to pave what the Panthers had stated they would be paving. And it’s presently owned by the Panthers.

“That piece of property is tied in litigation right now. This should not even be up for (a decision).”

Audette said the bankruptcy proceeding should finish before public money goes for paving roads.

Rock Hill Mayor John Gettys voted in favor of allocating the money. So did fellow committee members Jim Reno and Kathy Pender, both on Rock Hill City Council. Others in favor included S.C. Sen. Wes Climer and Chief Bill Harris with Catawba Indian Nation. County Councilman Joel Hamilton also voted yes.

“The option isn’t, ‘is this the greatest answer?’” Gettys said. “The option is, do we want to have a bridge to nowhere in York County?”

A final decision would mean $17.7 million, which had been slotted for the I-77 and Celanese Road project in Rock Hill, will be moved. Road work surrounding the new exit 81 interchange will get $10 million. That’s the Rock Hill exit built to serve what would’ve been the Panthers headquarters.

The other $7.7 million goes to the interchange at I-77 and exit 77 in Rock Hill. That’s where the interstate crosses South Anderson Road.

The new road work would link the exit 81 interchange with Mt. Gallant Road and Eden Terrace in Rock Hill. David Hooper, RFATS administrator, said federal, regional, state and local funds have about $149 million for the Celanese interchange, which isn’t likely to cost that much.

“I see both sides to this,” Carnes said. “My thought on this is, are we putting the cart before the horse? Shouldn’t we wait until all the legal process is taken care of before this is considered?”

Gray agreed.

“Until the legal matters are resolved,” Gray said, “it does no good putting roads on the piece of property.”

Gettys said the public part of the bankruptcy issue will be complete on Dec. 14. That’s in time for the final decision from the RFATS policy committee.

“This isn’t a great answer for anyone,” Gettys said.

Several RFATS policy committee members expressed frustration with the NFL and Panthers owner David Tepper for this situation. One member wouldn’t say his name.

Fort Mill Mayor Guynn Savage recused herself from Friday’s vote. After discussion with her town council and legal counsel, Savage made the decision because she hadn’t been part of planning, discussions or agreements related to the Panthers project.

“I’m not going to use the name of the team, or the name of the despicable man that put us in this position,” Savage said. “I think it’s extremely unfortunate that our area’s been treated this way, and put people in these positions to have to fight to make right what was an agreement.”

Some RFATS members wondered if Tepper would benefit from the new roads. Gettys pointed out the land is in bankruptcy and that would not happen.

“This property is not in litigation,” Gettys said. “It’s in bankruptcy. The owner of that property in bankruptcy does not have, by the definition of bankruptcy, the opportunity to improve the property.”

That point matters to Harris.

“This is a very complex problem that has been dumped in the middle of this room,” Harris said. “And with that I think it’s left up to each of us to assess, what’s the value of it?”

Harris said it isn’t uncommon for the group to move funds from one project to another. The current setup isn’t ideal, but Harris said you can’t “have a ramp that goes up, and it just sits there.”

“It looked like a good project in the beginning,” Harris said. “It was going to benefit the city, the county, the surrounding area. But that fell through. And this is what we’re left with.”

Harris said it’s important to do what makes sense — allow use of the new interchange.

“Spend the money wisely,” Harris said, “but resolve the problem.”

Gettys also pushed back on the idea that his city would get a piece of property through bankruptcy without any impact from the team’s decision not to relocate in this area.

“Rock Hill...is not just getting a piece of property for $20 million,” Gettys said. “We’re having to pay Mr. Tepper to go away. To take control of a property so taxpayers can get the benefit of what they’ve invested in public roads.”

Audette pointed to the idea Rock Hill stands to get the land where the failed project would have been.

“This is a conflict of interest of what we’re doing here,” Audette said. “I think that all legal matters should be resolved before any vote comes up.”

Hamilton said he has confidence the parties involved can continue to work toward resolution, including the roads. Hamilton said he doesn’t like the daily reminder drivers get as they drive down I-77 and can point to a new interchange “that goes to nowhere, and we haven’t been able to resolve that.”

“It has become an embarrassment, and frankly shameful,” Hamilton said.

Hamilton’s vote Friday was aimed to make the best of the current situation.

“The fact that this interchange remains unusable, and has thus far been a complete waste of taxpayer money...I don’t know we can tell the taxpayers of the county, the city, the state, the good folks in Lancaster who also paid their share of this coming from the state, that we’re going to continue to waste their funds,” Hamilton said.

For Gettys, there’s an expectation that if taxpayers fund a new interchange along the interstate, they’ll be able to use it.

“There is an intersection at I-77 that without a road, will not be operational,” Gettys said.

This story was originally published November 18, 2022 5:35 PM.

Baby Is First Born in SC's Newest Hospital in Fort Mill

FORT MILL, S.C. (AP) — Alyssa Ann Farley can’t talk yet, but someday she’ll be able to say something generations of Fort Mill residents can’t. She was the first born there.Farley arrived at 11:34 p.m. on Sept. 14 at 7 pounds, 15 ounces and 19.75 inches long. She’s the first baby born at the town’s first hospital, Piedmont Medical Center — Fort Mill. Parents Becky Hatton and Chris Farley met their third child after a scheduled induction.“It’s a crazy thing for her to be the f...

FORT MILL, S.C. (AP) — Alyssa Ann Farley can’t talk yet, but someday she’ll be able to say something generations of Fort Mill residents can’t. She was the first born there.

Farley arrived at 11:34 p.m. on Sept. 14 at 7 pounds, 15 ounces and 19.75 inches long. She’s the first baby born at the town’s first hospital, Piedmont Medical Center — Fort Mill. Parents Becky Hatton and Chris Farley met their third child after a scheduled induction.

“It’s a crazy thing for her to be the first one born here,” Hatton said Friday afternoon. “It’s very special.”

Alyssa is the first of her kind, and likely will be the first of many. Traditionally, expectant mothers in Fort Mill have gone either to the long-time Piedmont hospital in Rock Hill or have left the county for maternity care. Often across the North Carolina line to one of several hospitals there.

There are or have been birthing centers that serve delivering mothers. There are midwives who assist in home births. There are mothers who don’t make it to the hospital, like the 2017 baby boy born in a Chevy truck on an interstate on-ramp beneath peach trees. But overwhelmingly, babies are born in hospitals.

A state health department publication detailing 2018 statistics notes about 98% of babies born in South Carolina, are born in hospitals. Several recent Centers for Disease Control studies show similar figures for the country.

The first baby born at the Fort Mill hospital won’t be a town resident once the discharge papers are signed. The family moved from Virginia to Rock Hill in December. Yet there’s reason to believe the hospital set to serve Fort Mill and Tega Cay will see plenty of births in coming months.

State health department records show from 2015 to 2020, York County residents delivered more than 2,900 babies per year. Annual births held fairly steady in that span.

Combined, residents in those zip codes averaged 760 new babies per year from 2015 to 2020. The 29715 area, which has downtown plus southern and eastern parts of the township, welcomed 458 babies in 2020. That figure is up 26% in five years. The 29708 area of northern and western Fort Mill along with Tega Cay, saw 388 births in 2020. That number is up 24% in four years.

Piedmont’s Rock Hill hospital, which has served York County and neighboring areas for decades, delivered almost 11,000 babies from 2015 to 2021. It’s more than 1,500 babies per year. Figures were a bit higher prior to than during the pandemic. At a high point in 2017, Piedmont staff delivered 1,691 babies.

Future delivering mothers would do well to experience the care Hatton did.

“I enjoyed our experience, being the first ones here,” she said. “They were very excited when we came in for induction. They had their own little welcoming committee.”

At a ribbon cutting the day prior to Alyssa’s arrival, hospital and Tenet Healthcare officials spoke eagerly of welcoming a first baby. Hatton met several hospital officials who helped celebrate with her family.

“We definitely have all the visitors,” Hatton said. “She’s a little famous around here.”

Chris Farley, who like Hatton lived his whole life in Virginia prior to the recent move, said he can’t go out for a haircut of late without hearing excitement in Fort Mill for the new hospital. It’s two decades in the making.

Having been through the birth of three children in the family now, both mother and father compare the Fort Mill site favorably.

”It’s a brand new facility,” Farley said. “I would compare it to some of the best hospitals. To me it’s comparable. Everything looks and seems just like it.”

Everything from the induction scheduling — Hatton didn’t get that opportunity with the older children — to care after Alyssa’s birth was a positive for Hatton.

Alyssa lay for one of her first photos in a pink bloomed bow and a long-sleeved onesie with “Fort Mill Original” across it, her hands and feet nestled inside it. For future Fort Mill families, the new hospital likely will give generations of people a more literal use of the term, born and raised. Countless records from birth certificates to Wikipedia profiles for famous residents are much more likely to list Fort Mill now as the start of someone’s life. For Alyssa’s family, a new life starts now.

“Settling in,” Hatton said two days after her daughter's birth. “Getting used to a family with three children. We’re all scheduled to go home tomorrow. She’s passed all her tests. She’s got a little personality on her already.”

Hospital officials at the grand opening spoke almost wishfully of a new baby born in Fort Mill. As if they knew something of the family who would welcome that baby. Big sister Gracie, 6, tossed a coin in and wished on a fountain a while back for a baby sister. Big brother Nathan, 4, figures it must have worked.

“Ask him where babies come from and he says, well, if you wish for them it happens,” Hatton said.

Copyright 2022 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

People in York County are shifting. One place in particular just keeps getting bigger.

In a year, Fort Mill added more residents than all but two other cities or towns in South Carolina.The U.S. Census Bureau released new population estimates Thursday for municipalities across the nation. The figures show estimates as of July 1, 2021, compared to that same date in 2020. Of the 270 incorporated places in South Carolina, most of the ones in York and surrounding counties grew.The estimated 27,991 residents in Fort Mill in mid-2021 is up 2,736 peop...

In a year, Fort Mill added more residents than all but two other cities or towns in South Carolina.

The U.S. Census Bureau released new population estimates Thursday for municipalities across the nation. The figures show estimates as of July 1, 2021, compared to that same date in 2020. Of the 270 incorporated places in South Carolina, most of the ones in York and surrounding counties grew.

The estimated 27,991 residents in Fort Mill in mid-2021 is up 2,736 people in a year. Those estimates don’t include the vast number of people with Fort Mill addresses who aren’t in town limits, notably Baxter and the Carowinds corridor. Unincorporated, or township, numbers were released with the recent data.

Only the slightly larger municipalities of Bluffton (3,457 resident increase) and Greer (3,068) grew by more people than Fort Mill. If the number of new residents in Fort Mill alone were its own town, it would rank in the top 100 in the state (No. 95).

In a year, York County grew by roughly the population of Clover. Yet much of the county’s population lives in unincorporated areas like Lake Wylie, or beyond the outskirts of Rock Hill and York.

Of the 288,595 estimated York County residents in mid-2021, about 54% live outside the nine cities and towns.

Rock Hill hasn’t grown in recent years at the rate Fort Mill has, but it’s still the largest population center in the county. The 74,102 estimated Rock Hill residents in mid-2021 is almost 26% of the county total. Yet the city population is down 55 residents in a year.

Fort Mill accounts for almost 10% of the York County population. Tega Cay is next at almost 5%.

Trends are visible dating back more than a decade. The 56% of York County residents who lived outside city or town limits in 2010 isn’t far off the 54% current mark. Yet a greater percentage of county residents each year come from the areas nearest Interstate 77 and the North Carolina border with Charlotte.

Rock Hill had 29% of the county population in 2010, 3% more than it does now. Fort Mill had less than 5%, about half what it has now. Tega Cay had about 3% of the county total, a little more than half what it has now.

Since 2010 the county has grown by more than 62,000 residents. Or, almost as many people as lived in Rock Hill in 2010. It’s a growth rate of almost 28%.

In that span, Fort Mill and Tega Cay combine to account for 41,269 more residents, or about two-thirds of that countywide growth rate. Rock Hill has grown by 7,948 residents since 2010.

While they aren’t reflected in the new data, years of new homebuilding trends in the area show similar growth in two other areas that border Charlotte. Lake Wylie in York County and Indian Land in Lancaster County remain some of the highest-growth areas in the region.

Both Lake Wylie and Indian Land are unincorporated areas. Their growth is reflected in countywide totals for their respective counties.

Here’s a look at one-year growth for municipalities in York, Lancaster and Chester counties:

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