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8300 Dorchester Rd Ste B, North Charleston, SC 29418
8300 Dorchester Rd Ste B, North Charleston, SC 29418

Sievert Electrical Contractors LLC

Electricians in Johns Island, SC

Contact For Services

Some of our most requested residential electrical services include the following.

Electricians Johns Island, SC

Electrical Services for Spas and Pools

Looking to add value to your home? Installing a spa or pool is a wonderful idea to add to your list. Plus, your backyard barbecues will be much more fun. The process of installing a pool or spa isn't something you can handle on your own, though. You will need a team of experienced electricians in Johns Island, SC to ensure your system is set up correctly. That way, you can enjoy your pool or spa for years to come, and it'll be in great working order when it's time to sell.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for Pool or Spa Installation?

Installing a pool or spa is a very involved job that includes more than digging out space for a pool or spa. These units are very complex and have a whole host of electrical needs, from heating units and filters to color-changing lights that wow your guests. Having a professional install these parts is vital. Otherwise, you'll be swimming in a dirty, near-freezing pool or spa.

Hiring Sievert Electrical Contractors guarantees your pool or spa will be in proper working order for years and years.

EV Charging Station Installation

Finding a reliable EV charging station when you're out and about is still a gamble in this day and age. While EV charger availability is improving, most EV owners prefer to have a charging station installed at home. But doing so is easier said than done and often requires the help of a professional electrician.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for EV Charging Station Installation?

If you're like most homeowners, you don't have the proper permit to install your own EV charging station. For that reason alone, you need to rely on a pro who has the right tools and electrical know-how to handle the job. Plus, EV chargers need much more voltage than standard electrical systems you may find in your home. That makes installing these devices much more dangerous than average appliances. Hiring Sievert Electrical Contractors to install your charging station ensures it's completed quickly, correctly, and safely.

Electricians Johns Island, SC
Electricians Johns Island, SC

Standby & Portable Generators

South Carolina's hurricane season is nothing to take lightly. Every year, homeowners in the Lowcountry prepare for high winds, heavy storms, and even evacuation. One of the best ways to protect your home and family in the event of a power outage is to purchase a standby or portable generator that can power your home when electricity is out.

At Sievert Electrical, we offer the equipment and electrical services needed to keep your lights on during emergency power outages. As an Authorized Generac dealer in South Carolina, our standby and portable generators can give you the power you need when it matters most. Contact our office today to discuss what type of Generac generator is best for your home or business.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for Generator Installation?

It's always a safe choice to rely on professionals than yourself when electrical matters are involved. That's true for generator installation, too. At Sievert Electrical Contractors, our team uses OSHA and National Electrical Code standards when installing residential and commercial generators. We know how to properly install generators, maintain them, and recommend them depending on your needs.

Because we truly care about your property and your family, we always take great care to operate with safety and efficiency in mind. When we're done, you'll know without a doubt that you made the right choice hiring our electricians in Johns Island, SC

Commercial Upfits

Here at Sievert Electrical Contractors, one of our many commercial services involves turning working vehicles into vehicles that work for you. Whether you're an electrician or occupy a different profession, our commercial upfit services will help make your workday easier and more productive, so you can be more profitable.

Our commercial upfits help experts with a wide range of issues, including:

Electricians Johns Island, SC

Organization: One of the most common complaints we hear from tradespeople and business owners is that their trucks or vans are an organizational mess. Our upfit services help you get organized, so you're not having to toss important tools into the back of your truck.

Efficiency: With our commercial upfits in place, you won't waste time trying to find all those items you had to toss in the back of your truck. Our upfits let you carry more gear, maximize your space, and ultimately be more productive.

Professionalism: When you travel to a client's home or business, you need to present a proper image of professionalism. You'll give the wrong impression if your work van is messy and disorganized.

Don't see the commercial electric service you need? Chances are we can still help. Give our office a call today and let us know about the challenges you're facing. In the meantime, here are some additional commercial services that we offer:

  • New Business Construction Wiring
  • Commercial Upfits
  • Panel Upgrades
  • Electrical Grounding
  • Circuit Testing
  • Circuit Breaker Replacement
  • Troubleshooting
  • Commercial Lighting Installation
  • Rewiring and Remodels
  • Safety Inspections
Industrial Panel Upgrades and Installations

Industrial Panel Upgrades and Installations


Are you fed up with spending money on new fuses? Do your employees nag you about weird electrical glitches that interrupt their workflow? If so, it's time to call Sievert Electrical. Our team of commercial electricians will diagnose and remediate your electric panel problems quickly and effectively.

Installing or updating the panels in your industrial facility protects you, your co-workers, employees, and your building from electrical fire risks. Electrical panel installation from our electricians in Johns Island, SC is important because it protects your other electrical systems, which prolongs the overall lifespan of your system. Safety is always our top priority at Sievert Electrical Contractors, which is why we believe the right way is the only way to install or upgrade your industrial-grade electrical panels.

Our industrial panel services include:

  • Rewiring
  • Updating
  • Replacing
  • Age of System
  • Bringing Systems Up to Code
Industrial Electric Repair

Industrial Electric Repair


When it comes to electrical repair services, serving industrial needs is often more comprehensive and complex than those in the residential space.

Industrial electricians must deal with more complex electrical systems. These advanced systems often need different equipment and tools when repairs to industrial-grade elements are required. Unlike residential repairs, in industrial settings, electrical systems are usually custom-made for the facility and include unique parts with higher voltages than in the typical home. And while no electrical issue is good, industrial failures have massive repercussions that can often shut enterprises down when their temperature control, machinery, and automated PLCs are affected.

For those reasons alone, you need the best electric pros to perform industrial-level electric repairs. Fortunately, Sievert Electrical Contractors is here to help. Our industrial electricians have the experience and expertise to tackle the most complicated industrial electric repairs, whether you own a warehouse, medical center, or another type of industrial facility.

Contact For Services

The Tri-County Area's Most Trusted Electricians in Johns Island, SC

Don't leave your home or business in the hands of unqualified handymen or unlicensed contractors. With decades of combined experience, Sievert Electrical Contractors specializes in a wide variety of custom electrical services. We go the extra mile to exceed expectations, because that's how we would want our families treated. Call us today to discover the Sievert Electrical difference.

Electricians Johns Island, SC

Contact For Service

phone-number 843-873-6331

Latest News in Johns Island, SC

Newly proposed Charleston City Council districts give Johns Island its own representative

After a decade of booming population growth, Johns Island may get its own representative on Charleston City Council.But making that change could cost a sitting council member their seat.The island is now in District 5, which also spans much of outer West Ashley. It is represented by Councilman Karl Brady, who lives in West Ashley.Two newly proposed City Council district maps...

After a decade of booming population growth, Johns Island may get its own representative on Charleston City Council.

But making that change could cost a sitting council member their seat.

The island is now in District 5, which also spans much of outer West Ashley. It is represented by Councilman Karl Brady, who lives in West Ashley.

Two newly proposed City Council district maps make Johns Island its own district without any extension into West Ashley. That means the City Council member to represent it would have to live on Johns Island.

“There is no one on council right now that drives our roads every day, sends their kids to school here, works here or lives here,” said John Zlogar, chairman of the Johns Island Task Force.

The group was established in 2013 to bring together residents and local officials to address Johns Island-specific issues.

While Zlogar said he has no issue with Brady, he said he would like to have a council member who can put their sole focus on the island.

“We will feel like we have someone that has our voice,” he said.

The island, which is partially within the city of Charleston and partially within unincorporated Charleston County, has deep roots in agriculture and the city’s Black history. Several Black family farms have run their businesses on the island since Reconstruction, when formerly enslaved laborers took over former plantations.

An “urban growth boundary,” established across the island limits where agricultural land must be protected and where development is allowed. Most of the city’s side of the island is located within the urban growth boundary and as a result has seen a massive influx of residents looking for a lower cost of living than the city’s core. Between 2010 and 2020, District 5, the district with Johns Island and West Ashley, grew a staggering 154 percent.

The redistricting process

Charleston Chief Innovation Officer Tracy McKee has led the city through the redistricting process three times in her career. Factoring in population growth between 2010 and 2020, McKee and city staff have been in the process of redrawing the council district boundaries for months.

“Four council members live on the peninsula, but we’ve had more growth in Berkeley County on Daniel Island and on Johns Island,” McKee said.

Every 10 years, the U.S. Census Bureau releases new population and demographic data that governments use to redraw voting districts. In 2020, it was delayed because of the COVID-19 pandemic.

City Council voted last summer to delay redistricting until after the fall 2021 election.

Officials try to balance the population size of each district as well as their geographic spread. In Charleston, for example, it would be impractical to include Daniel Island and outer West Ashley in the same district.

Initially, city staff put out one proposal in July. That plan kept all sitting council members within their current districts. None of them were at risk of losing their seat or having to run against each other to keep their seat. But the proposal split Johns island into three districts that included other areas of the city as well.

The map was met with some criticism for the wide span of geography each district covered. Districts were stretched from the peninsula far into West Ashley and District 11, covered parts of West Ashley, James Island and Johns Island.

The League of Women Voters published a commentary in The Post and Courier calling for more compact districts.

“Drawing districts to protect incumbents means the maps defy logic in many places. James Island remains divided into three different districts, one with very dubious contiguity as it crosses briefly over West Ashley and onto the peninsula. Johns Island, now all in District 5, will be divided into three different districts, diluting the voices of those residents,” the league wrote.

The league now supports the new proposals, mainly because the districts don’t stretch as far across the city.

“They keep communities together. These really prioritize citizen interests,” said Leslie Skardon, the director of advocacy for the League of Women Voters.

Impact to incumbents

On Aug. 28, city staff unveiled two alternative maps that took some of that feedback into consideration. The two new maps, referred to as 1A and 1B, are almost identical except for their effects on two current peninsula districts.

Both maps make Johns Island its own district.

To create the Johns Island district, city staff proposed two options. They can move District 3 or District 6 off of the West Side of the peninsula to only cover West Ashley. If District 3 moves off, District 6 will absorb the portion of the West Side that is currently in District 3.

Because District 3 Councilman Jason Sakran lives on the peninsula, he would be drawn out of his district. He would have to run for District 6 against fellow Councilman William Dudley Gregorie. But that seat is not up for election until 2025. In the meantime, depending on when council decides to make the maps effective, a special election would determine who represents the new West Ashley-only version of District 3.

The other scenario would be that District 6 would move off of its portion of the West Side of the peninsula. In that case, Gregorie, who lives also in the West Side, would be drawn into Councilman Sakran’s District 3. Because District 3 is up for election in 2023, the two would face off sooner.

Sakran said he would be OK with running against Gregorie in 2023, but he is most favorable of the original map that keeps all council members in their respective districts.

“You are overhauling peoples’ elected representatives to the tune of 40 percent of the city’s population,” Sakran said of the new proposals.

According to the city, if the original proposal is accepted, about 30 percent of the city’s population will end up in new council districts. If either of the alternatives are chosen, that number will move up to 39 percent.

Another factor in the process is the establishment of minority-majority districts. Districts 4 and 7 on the all three map proposals are majority-minority districts. They cover the upper peninsula and part of West Ashley, respectively. When the maps were last redrawn in 2010, the city went from having five majority-minority districts to three. Now the city is guaranteed to have two. As demographics shift, it’s difficult to group minority voters together and ensure their voice is in the majority in any part of the city, McKee said.

City Council will review the map proposals at its Sept. 13 meeting. No action will be taken. A public hearing will be held in the fall. Residents can view the maps and leave comments online the city’s redistricting “Open Town Hall” webpage at www.charleston-sc.gov/Redistricting2020. Email comments are accepted at redistricting@charleston-sc.gov.

Reach Emma Whalen at 843-708-5837. Follow her on Twitter @_emma_whalen.

Johns Island man provided fake name before jumping from I-26 overpass, report says

NORTH CHARLESTON — A man provided Charleston County deputies with a different name before he took off running across several lanes of a major road and jumping from an overpass.Kelvin Cole, 56, died Oct. 28 after being struck by multiple cars on Interstate 26. Investigators later determined he had active arrest warrants from Charleston County’s Family Court and the S.C. Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services.Cole, who lived and worked as a welder in Johns Island, was riding in the passenger seat of a car...

NORTH CHARLESTON — A man provided Charleston County deputies with a different name before he took off running across several lanes of a major road and jumping from an overpass.

Kelvin Cole, 56, died Oct. 28 after being struck by multiple cars on Interstate 26. Investigators later determined he had active arrest warrants from Charleston County’s Family Court and the S.C. Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services.

Cole, who lived and worked as a welder in Johns Island, was riding in the passenger seat of a car when a deputy stopped it for alleged traffic violations. The car’s 31-year-old driver was ultimately given a warning.

Attempts to reach Cole’s family Nov. 2 were unsuccessful.

The Charleston County Sheriff’s Office released an incident report Nov. 2, several days after Cole’s death. It provides new details on what preceded the moment he ran from the deputy.

Deputy Tanner Buller was patrolling around 10:30 p.m. near Stall and Mazyck roads in North Charleston when he noticed a white SUV swerve several times from its lane, the report states. The driver also failed to use a turn signal when changing lanes.

Buller, who has worked in law enforcement for five years, had a deputy-in-training with him during the stop. He flipped on his blue lights and the SUV pulled over onto the Ashley Phosphate Road overpass, which sits atop I-26.

Buller spoke with the car’s driver through the passenger-side window. The driver denied he had been drinking, but Buller wrote he could smell marijuana and alcohol coming from the vehicle’s passenger side. The car’s passenger, later identified as Cole, told the deputy his name was Raymond Brown.

Buller had both men get out of their car so he could search them. The driver admitted he’d smoked marijuana earlier in the day, the report states.

When Cole exited the car, Buller saw a beer can near the passenger seat. Buller found Cole’s driver’s license and noticed it did not match the name he’d provided the deputy.

Buller tried to detain Cole “but he pulled away and fled on foot” across Ashley Phosphate Road, the report states. The deputy chased Cole while trying to avoid traffic.

He repeatedly asked Cole to stop but the man “eventually jumped over the guardrail,” the report states. Buller saw Cole’s hands “grabbing the rail for a brief period” before he appeared to let go and fall onto I-26, the report states.

Buller never drew his weapon, said Andrew Knapp, a Sheriff’s Office spokesman. The deputy remains on duty. In addition to conducting its own internal review, the Sheriff’s Office also requested State Law Enforcement Division investigate the incident, Knapp said.

Investigators searched Cole’s name in a federal database and found he had an active warrant with the probation department, as well as three bench warrants with Charleston County’s Family Court.

Cole was the defendant in an ongoing child support case filed in 2016, court records show.

He was placed on a year of probation in February 2020 after pleading guilty in Charleston County to a forgery charge. Cole’s probation sentence would not be terminated until he paid all associated fees, said Anita Dantzler, a department spokeswoman.

Cole owed nearly $2,500 to the department, records show.

Commentary: On Johns Island, a sixth road alternative will save our sense of place

Johns Island is much more than a traffic jam: It is a collection of people with deep connections to place and community. Many have been here for generations and have roots in the island’s agricultural history. More are new neighbors who moved to this beautiful Sea Island seeking a purposeful way of life.The island’s roads are in dire need of improvement, which is one reason Charleston County residents voted for the 2016 half-cent sales tax to fund necessary upgrades, such as improvements along the Main Road Corridor. Work ...

Johns Island is much more than a traffic jam: It is a collection of people with deep connections to place and community. Many have been here for generations and have roots in the island’s agricultural history. More are new neighbors who moved to this beautiful Sea Island seeking a purposeful way of life.

The island’s roads are in dire need of improvement, which is one reason Charleston County residents voted for the 2016 half-cent sales tax to fund necessary upgrades, such as improvements along the Main Road Corridor. Work on Segment A, or the flyover at U.S. Highway 17 and Main Road, is moving forward, and now the county is considering Segment C: improvements to Bohicket Road, from Maybank Highway to Betsy Kerrison Parkway.

All five alternative proposed designs create four- and five-lane highways through the southern portion of Johns Island, drastically changing its character.

Hence the formation of Rational Roads, a nonprofit advocacy group whose goal is to develop a more effective, less destructive solution to the five unacceptable options provided in 2020 for the Main Road Segment C project.

Change is hard. New ideas are often deemed “radical” or even “irrational.” But change is necessary. Too many highways in Charleston have cut through and destroyed communities due to a lack of creative visioning. Better, more local solutions for road improvements exist, and to get there, the community must be engaged. Because who understands the safety concerns and chokepoints better than the local community? Transportation planners, engineers and elected officials should rely on community members’ insight from the beginning.

Our grassroots methodology is steeped in community feedback and data. Rational Roads has hosted more than a dozen meetings in the past year via Zoom and at churches, breweries, community gatherings and farmers markets. We’ve engaged developers, conservationists, pastors, students, farmers and more. We have found that Johns Islanders are deeply connected to the soul and preservation of this island. And we know that 21st century problems can’t be solved with 20th century solutions, especially when it comes to road building.

At Rational Roads, we are asking County Council to update the “purpose and need” for the Main Road Segment C project; that’s what will guide the direction of the Segment C project. We feel strongly that the purpose and need should include safety. Johns Island needs a customized approach for our community that goes beyond a five-lane road from point A to point B, stripping our community of its character and missing a critical opportunity to address safety concerns and create a connected sense of place.

We raised funds to work with traffic engineers to develop a sixth alternative, one that addresses our island’s traffic needs by adding left-turn lanes, roundabouts and intersection improvements at key locations where accidents are happening and congestion is occurring. Our local traffic data revealed that the worst safety and congestion issues exist between Mary Ann Point and Edenvale roads.

Through our conversations with residents across the island, we heard loud and clear that the road should be aligned with the island’s rural character, so Alternative 6 includes safe and connected streets with infrastructure for all road users, including people on foot and on a bike.

These types of improvements, combined with upgrades to Johns Island’s community center, would improve our sense of place, reflect our community values and enhance our quality of life.

Choosing inclusivity over divisiveness, we have engaged County Council members, elected leaders at the city of Charleston, state lawmakers and county staff, and we are finding renewed hope that collaboration can lead to bold improvements. Our plan can be adapted to avoid wetlands, home relocations and trees. Working with County Council and staff, we will keep improving Alternative 6 to ensure that it is the least-destructive and most cost-effective approach.

As we update our design based on recent feedback, we ask County Council to include safety and context-based designs in the project’s stated purpose and need. We can either have a road that looks like Highway 17 cutting through our island’s rural heart or a series of street and traffic upgrades that work together to enhance safety and incorporate localized designs based on a cohesive community vision.

We have the tools to build better roads. Rational Roads is showing that working together every step of the way will help us do just that.

Kate Nevin is a co-founder of Rational Roads for Johns Island and a Johns Island resident.

Oak trees in the crosshairs of development on Johns Island

Nearly 200 historic trees on Johns Island were on the chopping block at a Charleston Board of Zoning Appeals meeting Dec. 7, and the debate surrounding their removal is stirring up questions about preserving the island’s natural habitat while planning for booming population growth at the city’s outer edges.Developers requested permission to cut down 193 “grand” trees across two developments in cases heard before the board, which reviews projects that need special exceptions to city ordinances.The grand c...

Nearly 200 historic trees on Johns Island were on the chopping block at a Charleston Board of Zoning Appeals meeting Dec. 7, and the debate surrounding their removal is stirring up questions about preserving the island’s natural habitat while planning for booming population growth at the city’s outer edges.

Developers requested permission to cut down 193 “grand” trees across two developments in cases heard before the board, which reviews projects that need special exceptions to city ordinances.

The grand classification means the trees are more than 24 inches in diameter, likely indicating that they are well over 100 years old. As a result, they are protected by city ordinance. Not only are the trees considered an aesthetic trademark of the once entirely rural island but they are also a key component of the area’s ecosystem and a natural flood prevention tool.

“The trees help us for resilience, absorbing water, supplying shade and wildlife habitat,” John Zlogar, chair of the community group Johns Island Task Force, told The Post and Courier. He is one of nearly 30 residents who submitted comments to the zoning board in favor of saving as many trees as possible amid development.

Final decisions

The board ultimately approved both tree removal plans with some caveats.

Developers of the first project, a 71-home planned community near Fenwick Hall Plantation, requested permission to cut down 21 trees. The zoning appeals board reduced that to 15. They also stipulated that the developers of the property must hire an arborist to create a protection plan for the remaining trees and plant 151 new native trees with at least a 2½-inch diameter.

The developers argued that after having an arborist evaluate the trees on the property, the ones slated for removal were already in poor health.

“We designed the proposed concept plan which ultimately preserves 36 grand trees and impacts grand trees only with a health grade ‘D’ or lower,” wrote Jenna Nelson in a letter to the zoning board. Nelson leads the development’s engineering team, Bowman Consulting Group.

If those trees fell naturally, however, they would have returned organic matter to the ecosystem, promoting other forms of plant life that provide food for animals and insects, said Philip Dustan, an ecology professor at the College of Charleston.

“When (the tree) falls down. it slowly rots and releases its nutrients,” he said.

Tree removals at the second project on Johns Island, called Wooddale, were also approved by the board. Instead of removing 172 trees as originally requested, the developers revised the plan to remove 124. They must also develop a protection plan for the remaining trees and plant about 500 native 2½-inch or wider trees. They also have plans to establish a conservation easement along the southern portion of the property, meaning it will be protected from development moving forward.

“Multiple layout alternatives have been explored by following the natural contours of the site by placing most of the density in the highest area to minimize the cut and fill needed as well as minimize the tree and environmental impacts,” wrote Jason Hutchinson, an engineer for the development with firm Thomas & Hutton.

The Wooddale project has been in the works since 2013 because of a lawsuit that hinged on disagreements between the city and the developer about how to zone the development. As proposed, it includes single-family homes, offices, an assisted-living facility and other amenities, according to site plans. Because it is south of the island’s urban growth boundary, it is subject to stricter limitations than the northern tip of the island. The boundary was established decades ago as a way to preserve the island’s rural origins.

The Woodale tract sits not too far away from Charleston Executive Airport where conservationists secured a win earlier this year. The Charleston County Aviation Authority signed off on a deal to place just under 100 acres in a legally binding conservation easement. An agreement with Lowcountry Land Trust will keep 94 acres from ever being developed there.

As growth continues within the boundary’s limits, some residents are trying to advocate for developments with as little ecological impact as possible on the southern side of the boundary line.

Dustan, who lives near Wooddale, is not pleased with the upcoming development. The most ecologically sensitive solution, he said, would be to build elevated homes on pilings and keep all the existing trees intact.

By removing the native trees, the surrounding area is robbed of parts of a centuries-old root network, which can affect the health of surrounding trees.

“A lot of the trees that you see are actually related to each other,” he said.

Although the development follows the city’s storm water standards, Dustan is concerned that runoff created by the new development will overflow nearby Burden Creek during major ran events.

After hurricane Ian came through in September, water was about a foot below breaching the banks of the creek, he said.

“The curious thing is ... if we keep building like this, we might start flooding the new communities, too,” he said.

Procedural changes

Johns Island is seeing a massive influx of growth in ways that is not possible in more developed areas of the city. As a result, the island is seeing a patchwork of new developments separated by stretches of farmland and forests. Longtime residents want to see the city use modern planning tools to lessen the impact of new development on the environment and flooding.

“The area inside the urban growth boundary is only 20 percent of the island, let’s contain the growth in that 20 percent to make sure it’s smart,” Zlogar said.

A citywide water plan, which is currently in the works, will look at the city as a whole to see what types of flood mitigation are needed most and where they would have the most impact. Instead of tackling flood concerns on a project-by-project basis, the city is looking at ways to stop development that increases flooding and identify which flood projects need to be prioritized first.

Instead of trying to drain water as quickly as possible, the city’s main strategy is shifting toward effectively storing floodwater, such as in detention basins, and letting it slowly disperse. One advantage of this approach is that it helps prevent a sinking effect called subsidence. Shifting ground levels due to the movement of groundwater threaten buildings’ foundations and worsen flood risk. Forrest are a natural asset in this type of flood prevention, Dustan said.

“The best way to solve a problem is preventing it from happening in the first place,” he said.

The water plan will be worked into a new citywide zoning ordinance that Charleston officials are also currently drafting.

In the new version, officials want the zoning maps — the guide for what can get built where — to be based on elevation. High ground near major roadways will be fair game for high-density development, in most cases. Low-lying areas and wetlands will be restricted to little or no use at all. The ground rules for development will vary in each area of town. It’s an opportunity to set the framework for how Johns Island can grow in a sustainable way.

As these changes come down the pipeline, Johns Island residents will also have a new advocate in City Hall.

From 2010 to 2020, census data shows the island’s population within Charleston city limits doubled from nearly 5,300 residents to almost 12,000. As a result, in recently approved City Council redistricting maps, Johns Island will get its own council member for the first time in 2024.

How the city approaches tree preservation will need to be tailored to Johns Island, too, Zlogar said. The existing tree ordinance was designed with more developed areas of the city, such as the peninsula, in mind. There, developers are typically requesting to remove one or two trees in an already built-out neighborhood. But on Johns Island, developers are purchasing lots with upwards of 100 acres of land.

“We have a tree ordinance but to my knowledge there is no forest ordinance and that is the problem,” Zlogar said.

Every tree removed affects the overall ecosystem of a forest. And replanting smaller trees, even of the same variety, doesn’t have the same ecological benefit.

“It’s the equivalent of tearing down an apartment building and putting up a woodshed,” he said.

The other concern from Dustan and other community members is that the tree ordinance does not take a holistic view of the island. Saving contiguous swaths of forest is more effective strategy than saving groups of trees on a lot-by-lot basis. Having interrupted clusters of forest reduces storm water absorption and splits up wildlife habitats as well.

“We’re not seeing the forest for the trees,” Dustan said.

Reach Emma Whalen at 843-708-5837. Follow her on Twitter @_emma_whalen.

Johns Island finally has a sports bar that’s now open on Maybank Highway

JOHNS ISLAND — Gone are the days when island residents looking to watch the big games had to pop over to James Island to find a sports bar.Serving local craft beer and scratch-made pub fare, The Natural is now open at 3297 Maybank Hwy.The Natural is the second Charleston-area venture for Daniel Porter, who also owns Lowdown Oven and Bar on James Island.The new bar and restaurant is equipped with 34 televisions and an arcade area for the kids. ...

JOHNS ISLAND — Gone are the days when island residents looking to watch the big games had to pop over to James Island to find a sports bar.

Serving local craft beer and scratch-made pub fare, The Natural is now open at 3297 Maybank Hwy.

The Natural is the second Charleston-area venture for Daniel Porter, who also owns Lowdown Oven and Bar on James Island.

The new bar and restaurant is equipped with 34 televisions and an arcade area for the kids. For food and drinks, patrons can expect an assortment of domestic drafts and local craft beer alongside an evolving menu of appetizers and mains, like a burger with fries or chicken parmesan sandwich, served inside two buttered and toasted slices of crispy sourdough bread.

“This was the hardest menu I ever had to write,” Porter said. “I wanted to do a sports bar but I also knew we’re in Charleston and the standard is pretty high.”

A Johns Island resident since 2006, Porter has for years known the island needed a sports bar, but he has still been astonished by the turnout since opening Aug. 30. As football season kicks into full gear, The Natural could get even busier soon.

The Natural is open from 11 a.m. to midnight daily. For more information, visit thenaturalchs.com.

Smoked chicken wings, pulled pork nachos, Gamechangers and daily chef-driven barbecue specials have landed in Mount Pleasant.

Home Team BBQ is now open at 3563 Highway 17 in the former home of the Rusty Rudder.

The new restaurant joins Home Team BBQ’s other locations in downtown Charleston, West Ashley, Sullivan’s Island, Columbia, Greenville and Aspen, Colo.

Boasting the largest confined outdoor area and smokehouse of all seven spots, Home Team BBQ’s Mount Pleasant menu will look familiar, with barbecue plates, sandwiches and appetizers, among the options.

“It’s our greatest hits album,” said Home Team BBQ co-owner Aaron Siegel. “We’re just trying to be consistent with what we do best and I think everyone’s looking at us to do that.”

Siegel and Home Team’s three other operating partners (Taylor Garrigan, Sean Daniher and Tony McKie) teamed up with Jenny Keenan Designs and McGinnis Leathers to design the single-story structure, which has the same look and feel as the Home Team locations in West Ashley, Sullivan’s Island and downtown Charleston.

A long bar anchors the lively space with tables, booths, high tops and plenty of televisions scattered throughout. The entrance is located on the right side of the building near the outdoor area that has been popular since Home Team’s opening Sept. 22.

“It’s been great. It’s been really busy, obviously,” Siegel said. “Just lots and lots of families and kids and just folks from the area who have been waiting for us to open.”

Home Team BBQ Mount Pleasant is open from 11 a.m.-midnight Wednesday through Sunday. Siegel plans to open seven days a week and add takeout in the coming months.

For more information, visit hometeambbq.com.

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