loading
8300 Dorchester Rd Ste B, North Charleston, SC 29418
8300 Dorchester Rd Ste B, North Charleston, SC 29418

Sievert Electrical Contractors LLC

Electricians in Indian Land, SC

Contact For Services

Some of our most requested residential electrical services include the following.

Electricians Indian Land, SC

Electrical Services for Spas and Pools

Looking to add value to your home? Installing a spa or pool is a wonderful idea to add to your list. Plus, your backyard barbecues will be much more fun. The process of installing a pool or spa isn't something you can handle on your own, though. You will need a team of experienced electricians in Indian Land, SC to ensure your system is set up correctly. That way, you can enjoy your pool or spa for years to come, and it'll be in great working order when it's time to sell.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for Pool or Spa Installation?

Installing a pool or spa is a very involved job that includes more than digging out space for a pool or spa. These units are very complex and have a whole host of electrical needs, from heating units and filters to color-changing lights that wow your guests. Having a professional install these parts is vital. Otherwise, you'll be swimming in a dirty, near-freezing pool or spa.

Hiring Sievert Electrical Contractors guarantees your pool or spa will be in proper working order for years and years.

EV Charging Station Installation

Finding a reliable EV charging station when you're out and about is still a gamble in this day and age. While EV charger availability is improving, most EV owners prefer to have a charging station installed at home. But doing so is easier said than done and often requires the help of a professional electrician.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for EV Charging Station Installation?

If you're like most homeowners, you don't have the proper permit to install your own EV charging station. For that reason alone, you need to rely on a pro who has the right tools and electrical know-how to handle the job. Plus, EV chargers need much more voltage than standard electrical systems you may find in your home. That makes installing these devices much more dangerous than average appliances. Hiring Sievert Electrical Contractors to install your charging station ensures it's completed quickly, correctly, and safely.

Electricians Indian Land, SC
Electricians Indian Land, SC

Standby & Portable Generators

South Carolina's hurricane season is nothing to take lightly. Every year, homeowners in the Lowcountry prepare for high winds, heavy storms, and even evacuation. One of the best ways to protect your home and family in the event of a power outage is to purchase a standby or portable generator that can power your home when electricity is out.

At Sievert Electrical, we offer the equipment and electrical services needed to keep your lights on during emergency power outages. As an Authorized Generac dealer in South Carolina, our standby and portable generators can give you the power you need when it matters most. Contact our office today to discuss what type of Generac generator is best for your home or business.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for Generator Installation?

It's always a safe choice to rely on professionals than yourself when electrical matters are involved. That's true for generator installation, too. At Sievert Electrical Contractors, our team uses OSHA and National Electrical Code standards when installing residential and commercial generators. We know how to properly install generators, maintain them, and recommend them depending on your needs.

Because we truly care about your property and your family, we always take great care to operate with safety and efficiency in mind. When we're done, you'll know without a doubt that you made the right choice hiring our electricians in Indian Land, SC

Commercial Upfits

Here at Sievert Electrical Contractors, one of our many commercial services involves turning working vehicles into vehicles that work for you. Whether you're an electrician or occupy a different profession, our commercial upfit services will help make your workday easier and more productive, so you can be more profitable.

Our commercial upfits help experts with a wide range of issues, including:

Electricians Indian Land, SC

Organization: One of the most common complaints we hear from tradespeople and business owners is that their trucks or vans are an organizational mess. Our upfit services help you get organized, so you're not having to toss important tools into the back of your truck.

Efficiency: With our commercial upfits in place, you won't waste time trying to find all those items you had to toss in the back of your truck. Our upfits let you carry more gear, maximize your space, and ultimately be more productive.

Professionalism: When you travel to a client's home or business, you need to present a proper image of professionalism. You'll give the wrong impression if your work van is messy and disorganized.

Don't see the commercial electric service you need? Chances are we can still help. Give our office a call today and let us know about the challenges you're facing. In the meantime, here are some additional commercial services that we offer:

  • New Business Construction Wiring
  • Commercial Upfits
  • Panel Upgrades
  • Electrical Grounding
  • Circuit Testing
  • Circuit Breaker Replacement
  • Troubleshooting
  • Commercial Lighting Installation
  • Rewiring and Remodels
  • Safety Inspections
Industrial Panel Upgrades and Installations

Industrial Panel Upgrades and Installations


Are you fed up with spending money on new fuses? Do your employees nag you about weird electrical glitches that interrupt their workflow? If so, it's time to call Sievert Electrical. Our team of commercial electricians will diagnose and remediate your electric panel problems quickly and effectively.

Installing or updating the panels in your industrial facility protects you, your co-workers, employees, and your building from electrical fire risks. Electrical panel installation from our electricians in Indian Land, SC is important because it protects your other electrical systems, which prolongs the overall lifespan of your system. Safety is always our top priority at Sievert Electrical Contractors, which is why we believe the right way is the only way to install or upgrade your industrial-grade electrical panels.

Our industrial panel services include:

  • Rewiring
  • Updating
  • Replacing
  • Age of System
  • Bringing Systems Up to Code
Industrial Electric Repair

Industrial Electric Repair


When it comes to electrical repair services, serving industrial needs is often more comprehensive and complex than those in the residential space.

Industrial electricians must deal with more complex electrical systems. These advanced systems often need different equipment and tools when repairs to industrial-grade elements are required. Unlike residential repairs, in industrial settings, electrical systems are usually custom-made for the facility and include unique parts with higher voltages than in the typical home. And while no electrical issue is good, industrial failures have massive repercussions that can often shut enterprises down when their temperature control, machinery, and automated PLCs are affected.

For those reasons alone, you need the best electric pros to perform industrial-level electric repairs. Fortunately, Sievert Electrical Contractors is here to help. Our industrial electricians have the experience and expertise to tackle the most complicated industrial electric repairs, whether you own a warehouse, medical center, or another type of industrial facility.

Contact For Services

The Tri-County Area's Most Trusted Electricians in Indian Land, SC

Don't leave your home or business in the hands of unqualified handymen or unlicensed contractors. With decades of combined experience, Sievert Electrical Contractors specializes in a wide variety of custom electrical services. We go the extra mile to exceed expectations, because that's how we would want our families treated. Call us today to discover the Sievert Electrical difference.

Electricians Indian Land, SC

Contact For Service

phone-number 843-873-6331

Latest News in Indian Land, SC

An Indian Land road fix will go to court, while a Rock Hill job is delayed, again

A significant road project in Lancaster County is likely headed to court, while a long-awaited one in Rock Hill could serve as a test case for construction delays.Berry Mattox with the South Carolina Department of Transportation updated the Rock Hill-Fort Mill Area Transportation Study policy committee Friday afternoon on several ongoing jobs. One is an intersection improvement planned for U.S. 2...

A significant road project in Lancaster County is likely headed to court, while a long-awaited one in Rock Hill could serve as a test case for construction delays.

Berry Mattox with the South Carolina Department of Transportation updated the Rock Hill-Fort Mill Area Transportation Study policy committee Friday afternoon on several ongoing jobs. One is an intersection improvement planned for U.S. 21 and Marvin Road in Indian Land.

Plans are to improve the traffic signal there and add two new turn lanes onto Marvin. Design work is complete. But SCDOT hasn’t yet been able to get the right-of-way needed for the nearly $3.9 million project.

Mattox said the issued has been tied up in court and SCDOT filed a motion to dismiss a legal case related to the right-of-way acquisition. That motion was denied.

“This is probably going to go to trial,” Mattox said. “I don’t expect this to go to construction prior to 2023 based on what I’m hearing. Hopefully we get that resolved.”

David Hooper, RFATS administrator, said the gas station on a corner of the intersection is questioning the need for the improvements that would require right-of-way from that owner. The intersection has an entrance to the ALDI grocery store opposite U.S. 521 from Marvin Road. Turns across U.S. 521, or Charlotte Hwy., are common there in both directions and can take a while due to traffic.

“We felt pretty strongly about our position to have the case thrown out, based on they’re essentially challenging the purpose and need of the project which is pretty clear based on the traffic benefit,” Mattox said. “Apparently it was not seen that way by the judge.”

Another project discussed Friday in Rock Hill doesn’t have the legal issues present in the Indian Land job, but has been a while coming. The RFATS policy committee is made up of elected and planning officials from Rock Hill, Fort Mill, Tega Cay, York County and Lancaster County, among others. Mayor John Gettys from Rock Hill said work at Celanese and India Hook roads in his city has run into avoidable delays.

“I think there’s a lesson here for all of us,” Gettys said.

Plans are to upgrade the traffic signal and add new and longer turn lanes. Construction bids came in June 14 and were “a little bit beyond what we expected,” Mattox said. The project is listed by SCDOT at $7.6 million. The construction estimate is almost $5.8 million of that total.

“We’ve seen this before, and we may end up having to make a judgment call,” Hooper said.

One option is for the state to step back and wait for soaring construction material costs to level out some. Mattox said the state couldn’t award a bid because only one was acceptable, and it came in higher than the state engineering estimate for the project. Two other bids didn’t meet state criteria.

“This is one of those where, two-and-a-half half million dollars more, you can’t do that,” Gettys said. “We have to wait.”

Yet, Gettys said, there have been multiple engineering plans at the site in the five or six years since the project began. There have been multiple staff members — Gettys said he isn’t laying blame for delays on current staff — to oversee the work. Mattox said there was a change in plans involving whether to tie in bridge replacement work nearby. There were sewer and utility relocation issues.

“That project could have been done by now,” Gettys said. “Should have been done by now.”

There were similar problems, he said, with work on Riverview Road and elsewhere.

“When we are not approaching projects with a sense of urgency, we invite issues like what we’re having now,” Gettys said. “And population is worse now than it was five years ago. By the time this is finished, it’s going to be worse that it is now. We invited this today, by our lack of sense of urgency in what we’re doing.”

Hooper said sometimes when projects enter the engineering phase, there can be attempts to get the perfectly engineered solution rather than a quicker one.

“It can extend things,” he said. “You keep adding things on and money is not unlimited. Time is not unlimited in a high-growth environment.”

Gettys said there has to be balance.

“We don’t want to chase money to just overpay for things,” he said, “but this would be done with a sense of urgency.”

There are SCDOT projects that continue on schedule. New turn lanes and space at Carowinds Boulevard and Pleasant Road is under construction and should be done by the end of October. That project is $5.8 million. The I-77 and S.C. 160 interchange remains on schedule for construction bids next year. The current estimate is $93 million there. Early next year a public meeting will be held for the I-77 interchange at Cherry and Celanese roads in Rock Hill.

Gettys has asked multiple times if that public meeting could push up into this fall, but the state has to have alignment alternatives to share before bringing them to the public.

“The problem with doing it too early is we don’t have a whole lot to tell,” Mattox said.

The I-77 exit at mile marker 81 that was designed to serve the Carolina Panthers headquarter site in Rock Hill, which since fell through, is on schedule to be done by the first of May.

This story was originally published June 27, 2022 8:00 AM.

Delhi-Centre services row: AAP govt seeks clear demarcation of power, SC reserves verdict

NEW DELHI: The Aam Aadmi Party-led Delhi government Wednesday sought a clear "demarcation" of its power in the row with the Centre over control of services from the Supreme Court which reserved its verdict on the vexatious issue.A five-judge Constitution bench headed by Chief Justice DY Chandrachud heard Solicitor General Tushar Mehta and senior advocate A M Singhvi for the central and the Delhi governments respectively for almost four-and-half days before reserving the verdict.At the outset of the proceedings, the so...

NEW DELHI: The Aam Aadmi Party-led Delhi government Wednesday sought a clear "demarcation" of its power in the row with the Centre over control of services from the Supreme Court which reserved its verdict on the vexatious issue.

A five-judge Constitution bench headed by Chief Justice DY Chandrachud heard Solicitor General Tushar Mehta and senior advocate A M Singhvi for the central and the Delhi governments respectively for almost four-and-half days before reserving the verdict.

At the outset of the proceedings, the solicitor general, after some persuasive arguments, was permitted by the bench, also comprising Justices M R Shah, Krishna Murari, Hima Kohli and P S Narasimha, to file additional submissions on behalf of the Centre to seek reference of the Delhi-Centre power dispute to a larger bench of nine or more judges.

Singhvi concluded his rejoinder submissions by saying, "I hope the boundaries are clearly demarcated in black and white this time."

He said the existence of civil services board in Delhi shows that the national capital is not on par with other union territories (UTs), which do not have such services boards.

"A picture is being presented that the national capital is being hijacked. The problem is the other side is equating Parliament with the central government. Parliament can make any law but here it is an executive notification on services (which is under challenge)," he said while concluding his submissions.

Prior to his submissions, the solicitor general had said that a "crafted perception" has been created that the Delhi government has no powers.

He had said, "My fundamental submissions are that we cannot lose sight of the fact that we are dealing with the capital of the nation and the central government has a huge part to play in its administration."

He said services and the control over them are not applicable to union territories (UTs) at all.

"The union territory represents and is the extension of the Union and hence, there is no concept of federalism between the Union and its extended area," he said.

The top court, on Tuesday, observed orally it was difficult to accept the Centre's submission that the concept of federalism does not apply to a union territory as even 'panchayats' are an example for "decentralisation of power".

"It may be difficult to accept your (Centre's) submission that federalism only applies to states and the Union. There may be a different degree of federalism between UTs and Union. It may not have all features of federalism but may have some," it had said.

"Some characteristics of federalism are revalent even in relations with UTs. Even in 'panchayats', the concept of federalism is reflective of the need of the local government, decentralisation of power," the bench said.

Singhvi had said "I am seeking what is rightfully mine, my legislative rights in Entry 41 (State public services; State Public Service Commission) of the State list. I seek all my legislative rights under all entries of the State list minus three entries (Public order, Police and Land)."

Singhvi had also said he was seeking all executive powers in relation to the entries under the State List where the Delhi legislative assembly is capable of making laws.

He had said the Delhi government wanted clarity on the issue of control of services in the national capital as even this court would not like the dispute to recur.

In one of the earlier hearings, the top court had termed 'collective responsibility, aid and advice' as the 'bedrocks of democracy' and said it will have to find a balance and decide whether the control over services should be with Centre or the Delhi government or a median has to be found.

The Constitution bench was set up to hear the legal issue concerning the scope of legislative and executive powers of the Centre and the National Capital Territory government over control of services in Delhi.

On May 6, the top court had referred to a five-judge Constitution bench the issue of control of services in Delhi.

The apex court had said the limited issue of control over services was not dealt with by the Constitution bench which elaborately tackled all legal questions on the powers of the Centre and the Delhi government in 2018.

"The limited issue that has been referred to this Bench relates to the scope of legislative and executive powers of the Centre and NCT Delhi with respect to the term services. The Constitution bench of this court, while interpreting Article 239AA(3)(a) of the Constitution, did not find any occasion to specifically interpret the impact of the wordings of the same with respect to Entry 41 in the State List.

"We, therefore, deem it appropriate to refer to the above-limited question, for an authoritative pronouncement by a Constitution Bench," it had said.

Sub Article 3 (a) of 239AA (which deals with the status and power of Delhi in the Constitution deals with the law-making power of the Delhi Legislative Assembly on the matters enumerated in the State List or the Concurrent List.

The plea by the Delhi government arises out of a split verdict of February 14, 2019, in which a two-judge bench of Justices A K Sikri and Ashok Bhushan, both now retired, had recommended to the Chief Justice of India that a three-judge bench be set up to finally decide the issue of control of services in the national capital.

Justice Bhushan had ruled the Delhi government had no power at all over administrative services, while Justice Sikri made a distinction.

He said the transfer or posting of officers in top echelons of the bureaucracy (joint director and above) can only be done by the Central government and the view of the lieutenant governor will prevail in case of a difference of opinion on matters related to other bureaucrats.

In the 2018 judgement, a five-judge Constitution bench had unanimously held that the Lieutenant Governor of Delhi is bound by the aid and advice of the elected government, and both needed to work harmoniously with each other.

Fort Mill has its new hospital. Here’s what MUSC needs to build another in Indian Land

The brand new shine isn’t yet off Fort Mill’s first hospital, as plans further develop for a second in the township area.The Medical University of South Carolina applied for and received a certificate of need from the state to build a 100-bed hospital in Indian Land. It’s the same number of beds approved for Piedmont Medical Center — Fort Mil...

The brand new shine isn’t yet off Fort Mill’s first hospital, as plans further develop for a second in the township area.

The Medical University of South Carolina applied for and received a certificate of need from the state to build a 100-bed hospital in Indian Land. It’s the same number of beds approved for Piedmont Medical Center — Fort Mill, the long-awaited hospital that opened earlier this month at the corner of S.C. 160 and U.S. 21 Bypass in Fort Mill. MUSC bought property off U.S. 521 in Indian Land two years ago.

That property for the proposed hospital is 85 acres on Charlotte Highway between its Thousand Oaks Road and Windsor Trace Drive intersections. The property is east of the main highway, about midway between the two major connections between Indian Land and Fort Mill at the S.C. 160 and Dobys Bridge Road intersections.

Yet the property has constraints.

MUSC applied for an amendment to Lancaster County rules related to highway corridor zoning, which the property has now. A request to exempt the project from a host of land use rules was voted down by the planning commission Tuesday night. Lancaster County Council still gets to vote on the proposal.

The county has separate work ongoing to update its ordinances related to land use, and changes needed for the hospital could still be worked through using that route. There was concern Tuesday night among the planning commission that exempting the hospital project entirely from highway corridor development requirements could weaken land use development rules.

The particular hangup involves parking. County rules require parking behind the building, while the hospital group also wants it facing the highway.

“This building should be moved forward and the parking put behind it,” said Planning Commission Chair Charles Deese. “If we allow it this time, then the floodgates open.”

Sam Walker, who spoke Tuesday on behalf of the development group, said the exemption request is almost exclusively related to parking. There are site features Walker referenced, pointing to a submitted layout of the new healthcare features. Wetlands and streams there limit the buildable area to about 30 acres.

“Really what you see here on the site plan is the buildable area,” Walker said.

MUSC plans involve a 90,000-square-foot medical office building before the hospital even opens. The first phase office building would have a new access off Charlotte Highway central to the property, that it would later share with the hospital. The hospital would add a second access point farther south.

“What MUSC intends to do is hire physicians and staff in this area, generate their brand and give the patients the opportunity to receive care before the hospital is built,” Walker said.

That plan involves an array of medical services in the first phase office building.

“It is a cancer center,” Walker said. “It’s imaging. It’s orthopedics, primary care, women’s care, etc. Services that the community needs.”

Apart from urban hospitals, Walker said parking on only one or two sides isn’t done or conducive for medical facilities. On this particular site, parking only away from the highway would mean orienting the medical buildings similarly and facing chillers, generators, boilers and the like toward U.S. 521 traffic. Then, there’s the size of a parking lot that would be needed if it alone serves the site with 340 spaces.

“A cancer patient, perhaps, who has to walk 600, 700, 800 feet to the front door,” Walker said.

Ambulances, CT or MRI mobile imaging vehicles, janitorial services and others would need parking accommodations Walker said current rules don’t provide.

“All these people need access to the building,” Walker said, “and the current ordinance is prohibitive to do that.”

Existing standards for highway corridor zoning were in place by 2016, prior to the MUSC property purchase. County staff and planning commission members have discussed what rules may be amended specific to the site, and what concessions the county might ask within the development in response.

Walker points to a collector road study that shows a proposed public road connection through the property. Developers are working to create a new signal and public road through the site, something that typically wouldn’t be done with a medical development of this kind, as part of its pitch to work out the parking.

“We are offering to connect (U.S.) 521 to Henry Harris (Road) through this campus which limits, quite frankly, the flexibility and future opportunities for our campus,” Walker said.

The new Indian Land hospital is just the latest plan to serve a growing number of people in the township. Fort Mill and Indian Land each have grown at rates seldom seen in the region since Piedmont Medical Center planned and applied for a 100-bed Fort Mill hospital two decades ago. Fort Mill more than tripled its population since 2000, which doesn’t include unincorporated Fort Mill growth like Baxter. Indian Land at times has grown at an even higher rate.

Numerous healthcare providers have set up doctor, urgent care and specialty offices throughout the area. Piedmont built a standalone emergency room on Gold Hill Road. A rehabilitation hospital is in planning for the Pleasant Road are in Fort Mill. Several more senior living sites have been set up with memory care or other medical services, like Wellmore in Tega Cay or The Blake at Baxter Village.

When the new Indian Land hospital was announced, MUSC stated it would involve moving beds from a Lancaster facility to the panhandle to meeting growing population needs there.

This story was originally published September 21, 2022 12:06 PM.

‘It’s a scary situation’: Indian Land neighbors want change on road where crashes are common

People living in a neighborhood in the Indian Land area say they have had enough.INDIAN LAND, S.C. (WBTV) - People living in a neighborhood in the Indian Land area say they have had enough.People living off Regent Parkway say there have been more than 20 crashes in that 845 feet stretch of road in almost a decade. They say those are just the ones that are documented. They have been asking the county for help for years but the county says it could not help until recently.Cheryl Maggioli cannot say enough good things about...

People living in a neighborhood in the Indian Land area say they have had enough.

INDIAN LAND, S.C. (WBTV) - People living in a neighborhood in the Indian Land area say they have had enough.

People living off Regent Parkway say there have been more than 20 crashes in that 845 feet stretch of road in almost a decade. They say those are just the ones that are documented. They have been asking the county for help for years but the county says it could not help until recently.

Cheryl Maggioli cannot say enough good things about her neighborhood.

”The whole neighborhood is perfect. I’m thinking this will be my forever home,” says Maggioli.

However, she opened up about one major problem she has with it.

”People come down speeding,” she says.

A neighbor, Kristen Mesisco sent us this video showing us exactly what Maggioli’s talking about. The sound of tires screeching became an all too common sound for the people living here.

“It’s the screeching of tires that wakes us out of a dead sleep, then we hold our breath and wait for a boom and just hope the house doesn’t shake when it happens,” says Mesisco.

”I always think that someone could come right through that front window while I’m watching TV,” says Maggioli.

Although Maggioli says it has not happened yet, video shows people have come close over and over and over again. The concern ramping up is that kids and even pets could get hurt or worse.

”I don’t want to sell it but I don’t want to take the chance that my life is in danger either,” she says.

Neighbors say they have been complaining to local leaders for years about how dangerous this road is especially this curve. I took those concerns right here to Lancaster County Public Works where I got answers about what’s going on with this project.

”Now’s the time to put it on the priority list and have some repairs done,” Catoe.

Public Works Director Jim Catoe tells WBTV the road, Regent Parkway, just became a county-owned road in March. Catoe claims for the last few years of complaints, the county has had its hands tied.

”We moved as quickly as we could once the road became the counties. We’ve started our engagement with the design professionals back in May,” he says.

He says the project will be a complete overhaul—fixing the road itself and trying to tamper the curve. Catoe says projects similar to this one tend to take a long time and have a lot of parts to them. WBTV asked Catoe when people living in that area could expect a finished project.

”Timelines for roadway work are really hard to pin down because like everything else delays in the workforce, supplies, things of that nature,” he says.

Catoe says this project could take a while to complete so WBTV asked him if the county was willing to put up guardrails like neighbors have been requesting, but that is going through a process as well. Engineers did go out to the road to assess how guardrails could work.

”We would definitely wait on the recommendation of the engineer and discuss it internally to see what needed to be done,” he says.

Neighbors like Maggioli say after all that discussion though it could be too late.

”God forbid what if something happens. What are you going to say to our family? We were in the process,” she says.

The county has explained the timeline for when we can expect the redesign to be completed but they haven’t been definitive about what, if anything, they can do to protect these homeowners until that happens. Right now, that’s our lingering concern,” says Mesisco.

Copyright 2022 WBTV. All rights reserved.

Arden at Indian Land breaks ground

Arden, an innovative brand of 55-plus active adult living communities, recently broke ground on its newest Charlotte area location, Arden at Indian Land at 9885 Harrisburg Road.Upon completion in 2024, Arden will also be the operator of this active adult community.Arden provides a modern concept in age-eligible, rental community living for maintenance-free seeking residents. The community offers vibrant, modern living with an abundance of person-centered community amenity areas that foster easy socialization.Arden at Ind...

Arden, an innovative brand of 55-plus active adult living communities, recently broke ground on its newest Charlotte area location, Arden at Indian Land at 9885 Harrisburg Road.

Upon completion in 2024, Arden will also be the operator of this active adult community.

Arden provides a modern concept in age-eligible, rental community living for maintenance-free seeking residents. The community offers vibrant, modern living with an abundance of person-centered community amenity areas that foster easy socialization.

Arden at Indian Land has a hyper-local approach and features mainly Charlotte-based partners, including Harkins Builders Inc., R4 Architecture and UNC Charlotte.

“We are excited to bring this adult living community to Indian Land,” said Jim Lindsey, managing partner of Arden 55+ Living. “With an emphasis on local partnerships, we take pride in partnering with the leading organizations in the area to enhance and empower our residents’ lives. Residents 55-plus are seeking a lifestyle that fits their needs and can find that within Arden communities. We are thrilled to offer residents the opportunity to remain active and thrive within our communities.”

The four-story, 152,000-square-foot Arden at Indian Land community will feature 128 one- and two-bedroom open concept living options. Residents can expect an abundance of windows, natural light and modern kitchens, complete with white tiled backsplashes and stainless steel appliances.

Interior designs are provided by Charlotte-based Urbanik Interiors, who created a warm and biophilic aesthetic with the integration of southern influences. Design colors feature soothing blues, calming greens and warm brown tones.

Residents will have access to more than 8,000 square feet of top-of-the-line amenity spaces catering to the interests of those pursuing an active lifestyle, including a fitness studio, health and wellness room and an on-site pickleball court.

With an increased emphasis on outdoor spaces, Arden at Indian Land features covered terraces, a fountain, outdoor lounges, two fire pits and a grilling station, all in a beautifully landscaped setting.

The amenities at Arden at Indian Land are designed to offer flexibility in use and reflect the vision for a social and active lifestyle. The community also features plenty of outdoor space for pets within the pet-friendly community, including a dog park.

Arden at Indian Land will provide programming and activities based on residents’ preferences and focus on supporting a purpose-led life. Examples of this include life-long learning, artistic pursuits, fitness and wellness classes, local culture field trips and learning and testing the latest technology.

An ideal place to call home, Arden at Indian Land is tucked away from the bustle of Charlotte’s center city, but is accessible to all that Charlotte has to offer, including parks, sports venues, live music, museums, award-winning restaurants and more. Residents at Arden will enjoy many activities outside of the community, such as shopping, dining and exploring outdoor spaces.

To learn more about Arden at Indian Land or to become a community partner and better serve the lives of those 55-plus with us, visit www.ardenatindianland.com.

Arden 55+ Living takes pride in developing, owning and operating its best-in-class communities. Founded in 2020, Arden is expertly designing a new option for the 55-plus community living across the Southeast, dedicated to empowering residents’ lives through possibility, inclusivity and accessibility. Arden provides an opportunity for those seeking to be part of an engaged and active living community and plans to build 12 communities across four states before 2025. For more information, visit www.onearden.com.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.