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8300 Dorchester Rd Ste B, North Charleston, SC 29418
8300 Dorchester Rd Ste B, North Charleston, SC 29418

Sievert Electrical Contractors LLC

Electricians in Great Falls, SC

Contact For Services

Some of our most requested residential electrical services include the following.

Electricians Great Falls, SC

Electrical Services for Spas and Pools

Looking to add value to your home? Installing a spa or pool is a wonderful idea to add to your list. Plus, your backyard barbecues will be much more fun. The process of installing a pool or spa isn't something you can handle on your own, though. You will need a team of experienced electricians in Great Falls, SC to ensure your system is set up correctly. That way, you can enjoy your pool or spa for years to come, and it'll be in great working order when it's time to sell.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for Pool or Spa Installation?

Installing a pool or spa is a very involved job that includes more than digging out space for a pool or spa. These units are very complex and have a whole host of electrical needs, from heating units and filters to color-changing lights that wow your guests. Having a professional install these parts is vital. Otherwise, you'll be swimming in a dirty, near-freezing pool or spa.

Hiring Sievert Electrical Contractors guarantees your pool or spa will be in proper working order for years and years.

EV Charging Station Installation

Finding a reliable EV charging station when you're out and about is still a gamble in this day and age. While EV charger availability is improving, most EV owners prefer to have a charging station installed at home. But doing so is easier said than done and often requires the help of a professional electrician.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for EV Charging Station Installation?

If you're like most homeowners, you don't have the proper permit to install your own EV charging station. For that reason alone, you need to rely on a pro who has the right tools and electrical know-how to handle the job. Plus, EV chargers need much more voltage than standard electrical systems you may find in your home. That makes installing these devices much more dangerous than average appliances. Hiring Sievert Electrical Contractors to install your charging station ensures it's completed quickly, correctly, and safely.

Electricians Great Falls, SC
Electricians Great Falls, SC

Standby & Portable Generators

South Carolina's hurricane season is nothing to take lightly. Every year, homeowners in the Lowcountry prepare for high winds, heavy storms, and even evacuation. One of the best ways to protect your home and family in the event of a power outage is to purchase a standby or portable generator that can power your home when electricity is out.

At Sievert Electrical, we offer the equipment and electrical services needed to keep your lights on during emergency power outages. As an Authorized Generac dealer in South Carolina, our standby and portable generators can give you the power you need when it matters most. Contact our office today to discuss what type of Generac generator is best for your home or business.

Why Do I Need an Electrical Contractor for Generator Installation?

It's always a safe choice to rely on professionals than yourself when electrical matters are involved. That's true for generator installation, too. At Sievert Electrical Contractors, our team uses OSHA and National Electrical Code standards when installing residential and commercial generators. We know how to properly install generators, maintain them, and recommend them depending on your needs.

Because we truly care about your property and your family, we always take great care to operate with safety and efficiency in mind. When we're done, you'll know without a doubt that you made the right choice hiring our electricians in Great Falls, SC

Commercial Upfits

Here at Sievert Electrical Contractors, one of our many commercial services involves turning working vehicles into vehicles that work for you. Whether you're an electrician or occupy a different profession, our commercial upfit services will help make your workday easier and more productive, so you can be more profitable.

Our commercial upfits help experts with a wide range of issues, including:

Electricians Great Falls, SC

Organization: One of the most common complaints we hear from tradespeople and business owners is that their trucks or vans are an organizational mess. Our upfit services help you get organized, so you're not having to toss important tools into the back of your truck.

Efficiency: With our commercial upfits in place, you won't waste time trying to find all those items you had to toss in the back of your truck. Our upfits let you carry more gear, maximize your space, and ultimately be more productive.

Professionalism: When you travel to a client's home or business, you need to present a proper image of professionalism. You'll give the wrong impression if your work van is messy and disorganized.

Don't see the commercial electric service you need? Chances are we can still help. Give our office a call today and let us know about the challenges you're facing. In the meantime, here are some additional commercial services that we offer:

  • New Business Construction Wiring
  • Commercial Upfits
  • Panel Upgrades
  • Electrical Grounding
  • Circuit Testing
  • Circuit Breaker Replacement
  • Troubleshooting
  • Commercial Lighting Installation
  • Rewiring and Remodels
  • Safety Inspections
Industrial Panel Upgrades and Installations

Industrial Panel Upgrades and Installations


Are you fed up with spending money on new fuses? Do your employees nag you about weird electrical glitches that interrupt their workflow? If so, it's time to call Sievert Electrical. Our team of commercial electricians will diagnose and remediate your electric panel problems quickly and effectively.

Installing or updating the panels in your industrial facility protects you, your co-workers, employees, and your building from electrical fire risks. Electrical panel installation from our electricians in Great Falls, SC is important because it protects your other electrical systems, which prolongs the overall lifespan of your system. Safety is always our top priority at Sievert Electrical Contractors, which is why we believe the right way is the only way to install or upgrade your industrial-grade electrical panels.

Our industrial panel services include:

  • Rewiring
  • Updating
  • Replacing
  • Age of System
  • Bringing Systems Up to Code
Industrial Electric Repair

Industrial Electric Repair


When it comes to electrical repair services, serving industrial needs is often more comprehensive and complex than those in the residential space.

Industrial electricians must deal with more complex electrical systems. These advanced systems often need different equipment and tools when repairs to industrial-grade elements are required. Unlike residential repairs, in industrial settings, electrical systems are usually custom-made for the facility and include unique parts with higher voltages than in the typical home. And while no electrical issue is good, industrial failures have massive repercussions that can often shut enterprises down when their temperature control, machinery, and automated PLCs are affected.

For those reasons alone, you need the best electric pros to perform industrial-level electric repairs. Fortunately, Sievert Electrical Contractors is here to help. Our industrial electricians have the experience and expertise to tackle the most complicated industrial electric repairs, whether you own a warehouse, medical center, or another type of industrial facility.

Contact For Services

The Tri-County Area's Most Trusted Electricians in Great Falls, SC

Don't leave your home or business in the hands of unqualified handymen or unlicensed contractors. With decades of combined experience, Sievert Electrical Contractors specializes in a wide variety of custom electrical services. We go the extra mile to exceed expectations, because that's how we would want our families treated. Call us today to discover the Sievert Electrical difference.

Electricians Great Falls, SC

Contact For Service

phone-number 843-873-6331

Latest News in Great Falls, SC

Watch: US veteran takes down knife-wielding man in South Carolina Walmart

A knife-wielding man who a witness said was "demanding $20" in a Walmart in Columbia, South Carolina, was disarmed in dramatic fashion on Jan. 4, 2023. (Credit: La’QuandaLuxe via Storyful)COLUMBIA, S.C. - Walmart shoppers, including a military veteran, were captured on video helping to subdue a man waving around a knife and threatening people at a store in South Carolina.The incident was reported on Jan. 4 at a Wal...

A knife-wielding man who a witness said was "demanding $20" in a Walmart in Columbia, South Carolina, was disarmed in dramatic fashion on Jan. 4, 2023. (Credit: La’QuandaLuxe via Storyful)

COLUMBIA, S.C. - Walmart shoppers, including a military veteran, were captured on video helping to subdue a man waving around a knife and threatening people at a store in South Carolina.

The incident was reported on Jan. 4 at a Walmart store in the city of Columbia, according to local news station WIS-TV, citing authorities. Video recorded by an employee shows a man in a red hoodie shouting and swearing inside the store while brandishing a knife.

"I was at the self-checkout where I work, and the customer came in and demanded $20," the employee told Storyful. "I saw he had a knife after him yelling demanding $20. I said ‘Oh, he has a knife’ to one of my managers who tried to confront him."

Another shopper, later identified as veteran Demario Davis, is later captured on video striking the man in the red hoodie with a pole used for the checkout line. The man then falls to the ground, and another witness appears to take the knife from him.

Later, the man is seen struggling with responding deputies from the Richland County Sheriff’s Department before being handcuffed.

"I was at the checkout when my son noticed the guy walk in with the knife open," Davis told FOX News Digital, adding that the suspect then walked to the service desk waving the knife at a few female employees — who took off running from the guy.

"I then asked a female employee, ‘where is security?’ And she stated she was security," Davis recalled. "As I'm walking towards the area where the gentleman waving the knife is terrorizing other customers and employees, he yelled out when the cops get here I'm going to start cutting you all up."

Davis told FOX News Digital that another customer tried to subdue the man waving the knife, "but the guy tried to cut him in the face."

"That's when my military training kicked in, and I casually walked over to the object not only to take him down but also protect myself in case I failed, but with my great military training I was able to neutralize the threat until law enforcement arrived," Davis added.

"I’m a community person, so if I see something in the community that’s not right, with all the violence and things and attacks going on, gun violence you know, you want your people in the community to step up as well," Davis continued. "The cops can’t do it all by themselves."

The Crisis Intervention Team with the Richland County Sheriff’s Department assessed the man at the Walmart store and decided to take him to a local hospital for an evaluation, according to WIS-TV.

No charges were immediately filed, the station reported.

This story was reported from Cincinnati.

Rapids and renewal: Great Falls hope kayaking brings success

More than 115 years have passed since two dams were built on the Catawba River in the sleepy town of Great Falls to power three textile mills.The mills in this Chester County town closed decades ago.Residents still live in the mill villages. Historic store fronts along the town's main roads have been shuttered for years.Residents have one grocery store, the Great Falls IGA, once a Piggly Wiggly. One of the town's remaining restaurants, The Flopeye Diner, has a sign on the porch with the word "hope."Now, ...

More than 115 years have passed since two dams were built on the Catawba River in the sleepy town of Great Falls to power three textile mills.

The mills in this Chester County town closed decades ago.

Residents still live in the mill villages. Historic store fronts along the town's main roads have been shuttered for years.

Residents have one grocery store, the Great Falls IGA, once a Piggly Wiggly. One of the town's remaining restaurants, The Flopeye Diner, has a sign on the porch with the word "hope."

Now, town and state leaders are hoping restaurants, shops, hotels and tourism-based companies will flood the town and wash away its economically-depressed status with the completion of Duke Energy's wide-scale project on the Catawba River.

Duke officials said the Great Falls-Dearborn project, which will create new recreational channels along the river for kayaking, is about 70% complete.

The project was scheduled to open this summer, but additional work was needed, said Michael Brissie, manager of generation project engineering for Duke. Brissie said the facilities will open in spring of 2023.

The project has many components — public to access channels on the river, a state park with hiking trails, an historic visitor's center, a pedestrian bridge, a 3,000-foot hiking trail on an island, parking and restrooms — all within three miles.

"This is a game-changer, obviously for Great Falls," state Sen. Mike Fanning said.

Duke started construction on the project at the Great Falls Reservoir more than a year ago. As part of a new license for the Catawba-Wateree Project in 2015, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission requires Duke to provide recreation, enhancement to water quality and quantity, fish and wildlife habitat protection and land conservation along the river.

The main focus of this project is to bring water back to two channels, or bypasses, that were cut off more than a hundred years ago. Those channels made up the 50-foot Great Falls of the Catawba, the town's namesake.

One channel will be the long bypass, a 2.25 mile stretch for leisure kayaking and canoeing. The long bypass will have Class II and III rapids, which are appropriate for families and individuals wanting a leisurely trip down the river, said Duke spokesman Ben Williamson. The short bypass will have faster water flowing over three-quarters of a mile that will have Class III and IV rapids and is geared more to experienced kayakers, said Christy Churchill, recreation planner for Duke.

Duke can control how much water it releases into the channels. Tourists will be able to check the flow schedules online, or through an app, when planning trips.

To date, Duke has built the Nitrolee Access Area with restrooms and parking for 100 vehicles. Nitrolee will be the primary public hub for access the Great Falls Reservoir and the long bypass. Adjacent to the parking lot on property owned by the Catawba Valley Land Trust is the Arc Building that was part of the Nitrolee plant in the early 1900s. The historic building will become the visitor's center.

Within a year of the project's completion, the site will be connected to the Carolina Thread Trail, a regional network of "connected greenways, trails and blueways that reaches 15 counties," according to the trail's website.

Another component of the project will be a state park on Dearborn Island. Duke is providing money to the South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism to help the state develop a park on the 600-acre island with trails, Churchill said. Construction on the park, which will have a campground area, will begin once the lease with Duke and SCPRT is finalized, she said.

Duke also will build a pedestrian bridge from a kayak launch to provide access to the island.

Fanning said ideas are floating to offer a unique camping experience, including "glamping," or glamorous camping, where campers stay in modern-day yurts. He said Dearborn Island will be the third state park in Chester County, which is rare in South Carolina.

"We have plenty of regular camping and so this island is going to be a way for you to spend time on a campground and have a different form of camping," Fanning said.

Duke also will create a trail, roughly half a mile, on Mountain Island at the Cedar Creek Reservoir that will allow kayakers to hike back and put their kayaks back in the water.

Churchill said the Dearborn project is unique.

"I would bet in the country, it's pretty one-of-a-kind," Churchill said. "It's like an engineered system to enhance the natural experience."

Glinda Price Coleman, executive director of the Great Falls Town Home Association, said the return of the water is a "game changer" since the mills closed in the 1980s.

"And since then, there's been several attempts to do something to punch up the economic structure here in town," she said.

The Great Falls Home Town Association is a community and economic development nonprofit that has rallied to have nature-based tourism brought to Great Falls and the surrounding community since 2000, Coleman said.

Coleman said developers and businesses are looking into the area, but could not elaborate on specific plans. The plan now is to bring opportunities for local entrepreneurship and attract businesses to set up shop, Coleman said.

Coleman said an array of business would "be another layer of what will bring people here, not only the natural beauty that we have in the area and outdoor recreation opportunities that we have with the trails and the whitewater and the state park."

Data produced by the nonprofit, American Whitewater, estimates that whitewater activities alone will bring $3.1-$4.6 million to Great Falls annually. Coleman has said it will likely exceed that.

"I think it's providing (Great Falls) a catalyst to begin work from their perspective and from their point-of-view building back their town," Churchill said. "We're building the recreation and then from there, hopefully they can build up interest in the general public and tourism to come down to this area and go rafting, go to the park on the trails, and hopefully bring some economic benefit to the area."

Fanning said Chester County has been "looking for that next big thing and the timing is perfect."

He pointed to California-based wine giant E&J Gallo, which is building its first East Coast facility in Fort Lawn, a small town in Chester County.

Fanning said the Dearborn project "will be the single largest development, economic development, dollar amount that we've seen in a project that was not a business in the history of Chester County."

Fanning said 53 business leaders, residents and town officials from Chester, Lancaster, York and Fairfield counties meet every month to discuss the project.

"I don't want it just to have water that comes down at a high speed," Fanning said. "We're looking to promote this as a destination for people to come and spend their time and just take advantage of spending time outdoors."

Fanning said community members have met with investors to promote the area. The discussions have centered around Great Falls but Fanning is touting Eastern Chester County as the "outdoor recreational capital of the Southeast."

He said the experience will be "phenomenal." "You think about the fact that people have been doing indoor whitewater rafting in Charlotte forever," Fanning said. "Meaning we know there's a demand, we know that we're going to have people coming from all over and it's going to be spectacular."

Kayakers can visit the U.S. National Whitewater Center in nearby Charlotte, North Carolina, but the Great Falls project is not an event venue or center, Churchill said.

"They are totally different animals," Churchill said.

The Great Falls whitewater experience comes from a free-flowing channel.

"Obviously the structures that we're building to help manage the flow is man-made," Churchill said. "However, the channel itself and all the features, the scenery, it's all nature."

Fanning said a year ago, locals were "rolling their eyes and saying here's another promise that will never come to pass." But now you can drive ... and you can see the work, he added.

"This is going to happen," Fanning said. "It will happen within the next year and it will be phenomenal."

Return of whitewater: Chester County, SC town hopes new park, rapids bring needed growth

More than 115 years have passed since two dams were built on the Catawba River in the sleepy town of Great Falls to power three textile mills.The mills in this Chester County, S.C., town closed decades ago.Residents still live in the mill villages. Historic store fronts along the town’s main roads have been shuttered for years.Residents have one grocery store, the Great Falls IGA, once a Piggly Wiggly. One of the town’s remaining restaurants, The Flopeye Diner, has a sign on the porch with the word “hop...

More than 115 years have passed since two dams were built on the Catawba River in the sleepy town of Great Falls to power three textile mills.

The mills in this Chester County, S.C., town closed decades ago.

Residents still live in the mill villages. Historic store fronts along the town’s main roads have been shuttered for years.

Residents have one grocery store, the Great Falls IGA, once a Piggly Wiggly. One of the town’s remaining restaurants, The Flopeye Diner, has a sign on the porch with the word “hope.”

Now, town and state leaders are hoping restaurants, shops, hotels and tourism-based companies will flood the town and wash away its economically-depressed status with the completion of Duke Energy’s wide-scale project on the Catawba River.

Duke officials said the Great Falls-Dearborn project, which will create new recreational channels along the river for kayaking, is about 70 percent complete.

The project was scheduled to open this summer, but additional work was needed, said Michael Brissie, manager of generation project engineering for Duke. Brissie said the facilities will open in spring of 2023.

The project has many components — public to access channels on the river, a state park with hiking trails, an historic visitor’s center, a pedestrian bridge, a 3,000-foot hiking trail on an island, parking and restrooms — all within three miles.

“This is a game-changer, obviously for Great Falls,” said S.C. Sen. Mike Fanning.

Duke started construction on the project at the Great Falls Reservoir more than a year ago. As part of a new license for the Catawba-Wateree Project in 2015, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission requires Duke to provide recreation, enhancement to water quality and quantity, fish and wildlife habitat protection and land conservation along the river.

The main focus of this project is to bring water back to two channels, or bypasses, that were cut off more than a hundred years ago. Those channels made up the 50-foot Great Falls of the Catawba, the town’s namesake.

One channel will be the long bypass, a 2.25 mile stretch for leisure kayaking and canoeing. The long bypass will have Class II and III rapids, which are appropriate for families and individuals wanting a leisurely trip down the river, said Duke spokesman Ben Williamson. The short bypass will have faster water flowing over three-quarters of a mile that will have Class III and IV rapids and is geared more to experienced kayakers, said Christy Churchill, recreation planner for Duke.

Duke can control how much water it releases into the channels. Tourists will be able to check the flow schedules online, or through an app, when planning trips.

To date, Duke has built the Nitrolee Access Area with restrooms and parking for 100 vehicles. Nitrolee will be the primary public hub for access the Great Falls Reservoir and the long bypass. Adjacent to the parking lot on property owned by the Catawba Valley Land Trust is the Arc Building that was part of the Nitrolee plant in the early 1900s. The historic building will become the visitor’s center.

Within a year of the project’s completion, the site will be connected to the Carolina Thread Trail, a regional network of “connected greenways, trails and blueways that reaches 15 counties,” according to the trail’s website.

Another component of the project will be a state park on Dearborn Island. Duke is providing money to the S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism to help the state develop a park on the 600-acre island with trails, Churchill said. Construction on the park, which will have a campground area, will begin once the lease with Duke and SCPRT is finalized, she said.

Duke also will build a pedestrian bridge from a kayak launch to provide access to the island.

Fanning said ideas are floating to offer a unique camping experience, including “glamping,” or glamorous camping, where campers stay in modern-day yurts. He said Dearborn Island will be the third state park in Chester County, which is rare in S.C.

“We have plenty of regular camping and so this island is going to be a way for you to spend time on a campground and have a different form of camping,” Fanning said.

Duke also will create a trail, roughly half a mile, on Mountain Island at the Cedar Creek Reservoir that will allow kayakers to hike back and put their kayaks back in the water.

Churchill said the Dearborn project is unique.

“I would bet in the country, it’s pretty one-of-a-kind,” Churchill said. “It’s like an engineered system to enhance the natural experience.”

Glinda Price Coleman, executive director of the Great Falls Town Home Association, said the return of the water is a “game changer” since the mills closed in the 1980s.

“And since then, there’s been several attempts to do something to punch up the economic structure here in town,” she said.

The Great Falls Home Town Association is a community and economic development nonprofit that has rallied to have nature-based tourism brought to Great Falls and the surrounding community since 2000, Coleman said.

Coleman said developers and businesses are looking into the area, but could not elaborate on specific plans. The plan now is to bring opportunities for local entrepreneurship and attract businesses to set up shop, Coleman said.

Coleman said an array of business would “be another layer of what will bring people here, not only the natural beauty that we have in the area and outdoor recreation opportunities that we have with the trails and the whitewater and the state park.”

Data produced by the nonprofit, American Whitewater, estimates that whitewater activities alone will bring $3.1-$4.6 million to Great Falls annually. Coleman has said it will likely exceed that.

“I think it’s providing (Great Falls) a catalyst to begin work from their perspective and from their point-of-view building back their town,” Churchill said. “We’re building the recreation and then from there, hopefully they can build up interest in the general public and tourism to come down to this area and go rafting, go to the park on the trails, and hopefully bring some economic benefit to the area.”

Fanning said Chester County has been “looking for that next big thing and the timing is perfect.”

He pointed to California-based wine giant E&J Gallo, which is building its first East Coast facility in Fort Lawn, a small town in Chester County.

Fanning said the Dearborn project “will be the single largest development, economic development, dollar amount that we’ve seen in a project that was not a business in the history of Chester County.”

Fanning said 53 business leaders, residents and town officials from Chester, Lancaster, York and Fairfield counties meet every month to discuss the project.

“I don’t want it just to have water that comes down at a high speed,” Fanning said. “We’re looking to promote this as a destination for people to come and spend their time and just take advantage of spending time outdoors.”

Fanning said community members have met with investors to promote the area. The discussions have centered around Great Falls but Fanning is touting Eastern Chester County as the “outdoor recreational capital of the Southeast.”

He said the experience will be “phenomenal.”

“You think about the fact that people have been doing indoor whitewater rafting in Charlotte forever,” Fanning said. “Meaning we know there’s a demand, we know that we’re going to have people coming from all over and it’s going to be spectacular.”

Kayakers can visit the U.S. National Whitewater Center in nearby Charlotte, but the Great Falls project is not an event venue or center, Churchill said.

“They are totally different animals,” Churchill said.

The Great Falls whitewater experience comes from a free-flowing channel.

“Obviously the structures that we’re building to help manage the flow is man-made,” Churchill said. “However, the channel itself and all the features, the scenery, it’s all nature.”

Fanning said a year ago, locals were “rolling their eyes and saying here’s another promise that will never come to pass.”

But now you can drive down S.C. 21 and you can see the work, he added.

“This is going to happen,” Fanning said. “It will happen within the next year and it will be phenomenal.”

Schedule preview: No. 18 UNC men's tennis prepares for indoor season

After a promising fall season, the No. 18 North Carolina men’s tennis team is gearing up to take on a competitive schedule of games.The Tar Heels, who won eight of their last 10 games of the 2022 regular season and made an eighth consecutive Sweet 16 appearance in the NCAA tournament, found success in fall individual play and will look to continue moving forward in the coming season.After only graduating two seniors last year and keeping a core contingent of players, the UNC roster is full of talent. The new addition of g...

After a promising fall season, the No. 18 North Carolina men’s tennis team is gearing up to take on a competitive schedule of games.

The Tar Heels, who won eight of their last 10 games of the 2022 regular season and made an eighth consecutive Sweet 16 appearance in the NCAA tournament, found success in fall individual play and will look to continue moving forward in the coming season.

After only graduating two seniors last year and keeping a core contingent of players, the UNC roster is full of talent. The new addition of graduate transfer Ryan Seggerman to the squad only bolstered its depth over the fall, as he proved with several standout performances.

Seggerman, a transfer from Princeton University partnered with graduate student Brian Cernoch and made a strong run in the ITA All-American tournament in October, making it to the finals before ultimately falling to the then-No. 1 ranked South Carolina doubles team of Toby Samuel and Connor Thomson. This performance helped them to a No. 18 doubles ranking by the end of the fall season — the highest doubles ranking on the team.

Following the conclusion of fall play, Seggerman represented Team USA at the Master’U BNP Paribas Championships, which pitted collegiate players from eight nations against each other in a knockout-style tournament.

Seggerman was able to come up with multiple key victories, including a match-clinching doubles win in the finals against Great Britain to aid the USA in attaining its 10th tournament title. Both this team victory, and his strong showings on the court over the fall, led to a No. 9 ranking at the end of the fall season.

The doubles team of first-year Benjamin Kittay and junior Logan Zapp also found success in the fall, making a strong push to the quarterfinals of the ITA regional championships before losing to Duke University.

The Tar Heels have also added Will Jansen to their 2023 roster in an exciting move for the team. The first-year from London was the under-18 British national champion and has a career high ITF junior ranking of No. 61.

North Carolina will look to utilize the experience that both the new additions to the roster and the returning talent bring in their upcoming matchups in order to make a deep postseason run. They will need to use all the experience that they have, in order to best a grueling slate of opponents.

The team kicks off the indoor season on Thursday, Jan. 19 in Chapel Hill with a doubleheader against Campbell University and N.C. Central University.

From there, they jump right into their challenging schedule, beginning with a match against No. 10 South Carolina the following Sunday. They will look to use their matches on Thursday as preparation for their upcoming ranked-showdown, which will serve as the first true test of the team's ability against top competition.

The remainder of the season doesn't let up and includes tough matchups against No. 1 Virginia and No. 3 TCU, which the team will have to fight to win.

In last year's contest against UVA, the Tar Heels fell 2-4 in a hard-fought ACC battle that they were ultimately unable to close out. It served as UNC’s first ACC loss, and put a damper on their season — something the team will have to try to avoid having happen again.

Additionally, the Tar Heels will face three back-to-back rivalry matchups against No. 19 N.C. State, No. 14 Wake Forest and No. 20 Duke to close out the regular season. The high-pressure matchups will be a test of the Tar Heels mental toughness and ability to handle high-stakes games, which will be important in the postseason.

This year, it will be crucial for the team to secure big victories to keep the ball rolling and make it past the Sweet 16 in the NCAA Tournament — something the Tar Heels haven't accomplished since 2019.

@PeaceGwen

USC drops home game to slumping Ole Miss as Rebels earn 1st SEC win. What we learned

For a brief moment this January — a flicker — it seemed like the South Carolina men’s basketball team might’ve turned a corner. The Gamecocks’ stunning win over Kentucky in Lexington last week garnered national attention and gave the fan base a jolt of hope that perhaps USC had figured things out in Lamont Paris’ first year as head coach.Not so fast.Hosting Ole Miss on Tuesday at Colonial Life Arena, the Gamecocks lost their second-straight game since defeating Kentucky, falling to the Rebels...

For a brief moment this January — a flicker — it seemed like the South Carolina men’s basketball team might’ve turned a corner. The Gamecocks’ stunning win over Kentucky in Lexington last week garnered national attention and gave the fan base a jolt of hope that perhaps USC had figured things out in Lamont Paris’ first year as head coach.

Not so fast.

Hosting Ole Miss on Tuesday at Colonial Life Arena, the Gamecocks lost their second-straight game since defeating Kentucky, falling to the Rebels 70-58. The Gamecocks (8-10, 1-4 SEC) lost to an Ole Miss team (9-9, 1-5) that had dropped six straight games and nine of its last 11 heading into the contest.

With the loss, USC’s win over the Wildcats is looking more like an aberration. The Gamecocks have gone winless in their other conference games, including 41-plus-point losses to Tennessee and Texas A&M.

Here’s what we learned from Tuesday’s USC loss.

The Gamecocks have been at their best this season when players like GG Jackson, Meechie Johnson and Chico Carter Jr. are making shots, especially from the perimeter.

The team has struggled all season long to consistently produce with their big men inside, and they rank 324th in the country with a 45.5% shooting percentage on two-point looks. When the Gamecocks are winning big, it’s typically because they’re making shots from deep.

That was not the case for USC against the Rebels on Tuesday, who held USC to just two 3-pointers in the first half and only 30% shooting.

Johnson, known for his deep 3-pointers and six made 3s at Kentucky, whiffed on his first four attempts before making his first 3-pointer early in the second half and was just 1 for 7 from 3 overall. Jackson (5 for 20) also had a difficult shooting game, though he’d finish with a team-high 15 points.

Despite losing six straight games heading into Tuesday, the Rebels never trailed against the Gamecocks and seemed in control for nearly the entirety of the game.

There was one stretch where it seemed like the Gamecocks might claw back.

Early in the second half, the Gamecocks narrowed the score to 30-26 with hot shooting and six missed field goals from the Rebels. But that’s as close as USC would get, as the Rebels immediately went on a run to expand the lead back to double-digits.

The Gamecocks have had flashes this season where they look like the best team on the court, but too often the wheels fall off before they can establish any kind of foothold on the scoreboard.

The Gamecocks clearly missed veteran forward Hayden Brown against the Aggies on Saturday, especially struggling to hold their own on the defensive glass.

After missing one game with a deep left thigh bruise suffered in last Thursday’s practice, Brown returned to the starting lineup for the Gamecocks on Tuesday and provided some stability with his leadership and gritty style of play.

Brown was limping somewhat on the leg during pregame warmups and didn’t carry his typical workload, playing 21 minutes for the game. It didn’t help that Brown committed his fourth foul midway through the second half and fouled out with a couple minutes remaining. He finished with nine points and two rebounds.

Saturday: vs. Auburn, 3:30 p.m. (SEC Network)

Jan. 25: at Florida, 7 p.m. (ESPN2)

Jan. 28: at Georgia, 6 p.m. (SEC Network)

Jan. 31: Mississippi State, 6:30 p.m. (SEC Network)

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